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Ric Modification

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by bassboysam, Aug 12, 2004.


  1. I saw a thread here a while ago about adding a capacitor to a 4001 Ric that would give the instrument more bottom end. The schematics were supposed to be on the Rickenbacker website but it does not seem to be there anymore. Does anyone have that schematic?


    thanks
     
  2. elgranluis

    elgranluis

    Feb 14, 2003
    El paso, TX
    it would actually be removing a capacitor.You probably dont need an schematic, just find the one that{s not the tone cap and take it off. If you feel like visuals will help, try ric's website. The schematic is there.
     
  3. frigo

    frigo burn in hell!

    Dec 8, 2003
    Italy
    you'll actually have to remove a capacitor from the treble pickup knob...
    here's the schematic.
    i did it on my 4001 and it sounded much more fuller. Defn'ly worth it!
     
  4. keb

    keb

    Mar 30, 2004
    And on the flip side, I actually added that capacitor to my 4003 at one point. It's a nice vintage sound, but after a while I really missed those growly low mids from the bridge pickup that the cap cut out. Some people add a toggle switch to cut the cap in and out for vintage and modern Rick tones.
     
  5. Z-Bass

    Z-Bass Supporting Member

    Apr 22, 2004
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Just curious but when removing a capacitor to add more bottom, are there any downsides, i.e. more bottom but less articulation or highs, or something along those lines.
     
  6. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    Just to clarify, if I understand correctly, you can't just remove the capacitor. As the schematic says, the cap must be replaced with a shunt - which is to say, you must either electrically bridge across it, leaving it in place, or remove the cap and reattach the wire that was leading to the cap directly to the volume pot.
     
  7. keb

    keb

    Mar 30, 2004
    In my experience, the cap only acts as a highpass filter. Just the lows from about 500Hz down are attenuated. The apparent volume increase because of the regained lower frequencies, after taking the cap out, may make it sound like there's less high end, but in reality there's no change in volume to the higher frequencies.
     
  8. frigo

    frigo burn in hell!

    Dec 8, 2003
    Italy
    yeah, right pilotjones, you have to remove the capacitor replacing it with a shunt.
     
  9. thanks for all the info, i will give it a shot
     
  10. HeavyDuty

    HeavyDuty Supporting Curmudgeon Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 26, 2000
    Suburban Chicago, IL
    No, you *may* remove it. It's much easier to simply tack solder a shunt around it - you can always go back to the original configuration with no muss or fuss that way.

    I did it to my '80 4001 within a day of buying it used, and would never go back!
     
  11. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    Ken's right - if you simply add a shunt wire that bypasses or "shorts out" the cap (is in parallel with it), you can simply snip the shunt back out at any time, and your "vintage" cap is untouched and original.