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Rick Beato Book

Discussion in 'Music Theory [DB]' started by IamGroot, May 2, 2018.


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  1. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    Rick Beato and Adam Neely are the only two theory guys whose videos I like. Straight and to the point and no no gloves.

    Anybody bought the Beato book?
     
  2. David A. Davis

    David A. Davis Supporting Member

    Apr 5, 2008
    Summerville, SC
    Nope, but I was just thinking about it.
     
  3. IamGroot likes this.
  4. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    Thanks, i will probably spring for it after I reread Levine' s jazz theory.
     
    Jonathan Eliot likes this.
  5. ErikP.Bass

    ErikP.Bass Supporting Member

    Nov 23, 2004
  6. David A. Davis

    David A. Davis Supporting Member

    Apr 5, 2008
    Summerville, SC
    I did not. I haven’t had enough free time to dedicate to it.
     
  7. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    I have not. Same situation as David Davis. I have listened and taken notes on almost all his theory videos in the last month. I am reviewing several other things right now in prep for going back to school.

    Someday.......
     
  8. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    I just bought the Rick Beato book. Its 461 pages. The first 60 pages were a good review for me. Now getting into 200 pages of guitar voicing - wasn't expecting that, but fortunately I play guitar.

    I will let you know how it turns out.
     
    David A. Davis likes this.
  9. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    The book is pretty good, but it is also a world of its own. I am working up to it. His Etudes are very pretty.
     
    David A. Davis likes this.
  10. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    Heres a little more info for anyone considering Ricks book.

    Its a 460 page pdf for $50. You print it out on your nickel. If you print double sided, it fits in a two inch binder. A lot of the material gets covered in his online lectures. But....its a lot faster to read his book and skim the videos. Plus you dont have to take notes.

    This book is intended for guitarists. Chapter 1 on theory, Chapter 4 on linear studies, and Chapter 5 on technique and practice should be accessible to any one who reads treble clef.
    Chapter 2 on chord forms is about 180 pages overlaid on the guitar neck without notation, so probably not much value for non guitarists unless you are just looking for the chord tones on the bottom 4 strins . Chapter 3 on scales and arpeggios has the same format. Again, some value for the bottom 4 strings.

    You can look at the table of contents online.
    - Chapter 1 is 90 pages of extremely concise theory and harmony. Very comprehensive, very well organized, lots of tables. If you already understand theory, its a great reference. Pg 13 has the major, melodic mnr and harmonic mnr side on one page which is very nice. I have this book on the bandstand to read at .

    If you are a jazz guitarist, this would be a must have text. I play guitar, so i am happy.
     
    Jhengsman and Jonathan Eliot like this.
  11. damonsmith

    damonsmith

    May 10, 2006
    Quincy, MA
    The videos are solid enough - too much pop for me. On the other hand, he only has 12 credits as a player on discogs. Clearly, he is putting a lot into this and is getting some money from the theory thing. The traditional sources, especially a good jazz bass teacher will likely be a lot better.
     
  12. ctrlzjones

    ctrlzjones

    Jul 11, 2013
    You're following following social medias credit system ... Fascinating (insert icon with Spocks ears). One would have thought that you're more into quality than quantity ...

    In the end everybody has to find his own way through theory issues. The self throned (and approved by fanboys) YT stars can only help you so far. Depending on your taste there may be richer choices than Mr. Beato.
    The obsession to write an "all in one compendium" is something common for guitar players. Many years ago I was working through a self published telephone book (600 pages or so) that tried to break everything (!) down to movements of wether fifths or chromatics ...

    Also I don't understand why people think that working another method presenting the same stuff in a different way would be easier. There are already excellent and consolidated books to deal with theory that are deeper and complete. The thing is that one has to work them, not just read through. That on YT one gets sound AND image is a big plus though ... And it's mostly for free. So it's a good idea to pay the professors back purchasing what they sell; wether it helps you or not so much. Or donations. And it's preferable to skip the monopolised in between editorials.
     
  13. Can you provide an example or two of the books you think are excellent, deeper, and complete?
     
  14. damonsmith

    damonsmith

    May 10, 2006
    Quincy, MA
    I don't think it is a social media credit system, it is more looking at whether the information he has made him in demand as a player.

    I think a good music dictionary and studying with a great teacher is the way to go. My mom studied composition, so I got my basic theory from her. The rest I got from my teachers as well as lots of "apprenticing" - something that is getting lost. In my 20s I started playing with a master alto player who had worked with lots of great musicians, (Bill Dixon, Cecil Taylor, Don Cherry). I would rehearse with him and help him organize his big band and other concerts.
    He helped me with a lots of concepts both basic and advanced.
    Around this time I started busking with a great tenor player, playing standards at the train station. I just walked behind him for years, only soloing on the intro to the Haitian Fight Song and Lonely Woman, walking quarters the rest of the time. I did this for 4 or 5 years, sometimes five days a week. He taught me tons about jazz theory in between trains.

    The point being, lots of great, advanced players need a bass player. Find one and ask questions - no question about music is dumb and no question can be asked too often.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
  15. ctrlzjones

    ctrlzjones

    Jul 11, 2013
    Sounds way more fun than watching YT videos ... Nothing beats real life experience; not even workshops.
     
    damonsmith likes this.
  16. ctrlzjones

    ctrlzjones

    Jul 11, 2013
    Mmh. Until nobody objects, that would be Mark Levine:"The Jazz Theory Book" ...

    But then again, the abstracts of reading, the knowledge of tricks, will only get you so far. I'd like to think it in parallel with all those "methods for picking up girls/boys". The don't work until you really believe in and or feel and really want what you're doing. The subconsciousness is way more powerful than one likes to admit, and in playing music it is everything.

    And that missing compromise makes a lot of people welcome victims for the vendors of snake oil ... And the winner is: the social media platforms, propelling a virtual life instead of the real and getting big bucks out of those necessities ...
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
    Dabndug and Jonathan Eliot like this.
  17. Space Pickle

    Space Pickle

    Apr 15, 2013
    I think Rick Beato is great. I'm watching him right now! I'll probably buy the book at some point just to help support the channel, but I don't really care that much about reading it. :)
     
    IamGroot likes this.
  18. The number of CDs or even the quality of playing of a musician has nothing to do with the relevance of his theory knowledge and quality of his didactics. Often enough good players are bad teachers and only know about theory as much as they need to play what they want to play or need for playing with those who helps him to make his living.

    A bad player might be a good arranger or composer or good in music theory because (s)he wants to know how music works. Missing instrumental virtuosity or even a bit advanced playing instrumental capabilities might not make their living as an instrumentalist or a singer, but that does not mean they are less good in theory than a virtuous player.
    It is easier to just listen to good musicians and preselect that way, but a lot of interesting people get excluded by this kind of behavior.

    Often enough even composers cannot explain what it means what they have written, because they just wrote down what was in their head, but cannot reflect theoretically about it. For the development of music, the theorists are in general behind the practical music, trying to explain existing music. In some cases theorists can show new ways to work in music from their existing knowledge and deduction. These extended hypothesizes need to be proofed by the generation of music based on this, so they might become part of the theory or might be rejected as not working (but this does not mean the hypothesis is completely wrong, maybe it only works in certain situations).

    So a good instrumentalist/singer might not be a (good) composer/arranger or theorist, a good composer might not be a good instrumentalist/singer or theorist and a good theorist might not be a good instrumentalist/singer or composer/arranger. There are some that are good (at least to a certain point) in more than one field, but it is very hard to find people that have very good abilities in all of these fields.

    So a deduction of theory knowledge by the activity and quality of playing does not say anything about the theory knowledge beyond the (maybe a bit advanced) basics.
     
    IamGroot likes this.
  19. damonsmith

    damonsmith

    May 10, 2006
    Quincy, MA
    You are not wrong. What I'd say to that is that the number should be lower then! 12 recordings as a player is an odd number for someone trying to be an "authority" on music theory. Zero might even look better..

     
  20. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    I bought Rick' s book to fill in the gaps in my theory knowledge. Its very complete as far as chord/scale theory and to the point. But I learned theory from other sources including Mark Levine's book mentioned earlier. I would not recommend this book to a novice player.
     

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