1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

"Rickenbacker 4620 Bass"

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Robert Canfield, Feb 26, 2015.


  1. Recently I've decided to build a short scale bass. I've had some figured maple, walnut and some rosewood sitting in my closet for a little over 20yrs. I've also been GASing for a 620 since the first time I saw the "Damn the Torpedoes" Album cover back in '79. I never seem to have the funds. I have been playing a 4003 since '83 and I love it. So I was thinking... Why not use a 620 body and head on a 30" scale bass. I recently joined this forum and have been encouraged to see other similar builds. And so my adventure begins. 11025814_10205328116714989_5303955590272018309_n.jpg
     
  2. ctmullins

    ctmullins fueled by beer and coconut Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 18, 2008
    MS Gulf Coast
    I'm highly opinionated and extremely self-assured
    Subbed! Race ya (no fair, I have a head start....) ;)
     
    mkfanforever58 likes this.
  3. What's your thread?
     
  4. Basshappi

    Basshappi

    Feb 12, 2007
    Tucson,AZ
    Oh I like where this is going!
     
  5. ctmullins

    ctmullins fueled by beer and coconut Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 18, 2008
    MS Gulf Coast
    I'm highly opinionated and extremely self-assured
  6. Gilmourisgod

    Gilmourisgod

    Jun 23, 2014
    Cape Cod MA
    Another cool Ric project! I'm loving it, at least two 4005 builds and one five string in progress. I'm watching all these threads trying to learn techniques for my 4001 build, great to see how multiple builders approach similar problems. Looking forward to seeing this come together.
     
  7. Ric5

    Ric5 Supporting Member

    Jan 29, 2008
    Colorado
    I disclose nothing
    I have toyed with the idea of making a bass like this for years ...

    6002bass-b.jpg
     
  8. I also was concerned with neck dive. Can I get some opinions about this possible fix? Enlarging the entire upper bout. 4620 body 003.jpg
     
    Atshen likes this.
  9. Gilmourisgod

    Gilmourisgod

    Jun 23, 2014
    Cape Cod MA
    I think the third example is as far as you should push it. Rics always have a flow between upper and lower bout, in this case an ellipse interrupted by the neck. The 4001 follows the same philosophy. You can extend the upper horn as long as it still flows into the lower bout.
     
    blindrabbit likes this.
  10. The 3rd one is the 620 body shape unchanged. The 1st one is the most changed. The 2nd one is in between the two. I know what you're saying though. Without me building a prototype, I won't know how it balances.
     
  11. While I'm waiting for some parts I thought I would work on some detail ideas. Ric-walnut-logo.jpg
     
  12. Gilmourisgod

    Gilmourisgod

    Jun 23, 2014
    Cape Cod MA
    Robert
    If you stretch the upper horn by sort of rotating the ellipse it forms with the lower bout, such that the upper horn is at or near 12th fret, it should balance. Hard to know until bridge and tuners go on, f course. For my first build I ended up making a plywood body mockup to figure out balance. A lot of extra work, but maybe worth it. I'm going to make a mockup neck beam out of poplar for my 4001 build, my first neck carve so I'm properly terrified of trashing my expensive maple. Nice TRC. Is that turquoise inlay?
     
  13. I think you're right, I should make a plywood mockup before I settle on a design. If it balances with the longer bass neck then I won't need to change the design.
    TRC? The picture above is pulled off of Google images then I slipped in my truss rod model in Photoshop. The "inlay" is Paua abalone. This will be my first neck build and I don't have a band saw. I'll be using a table saw, jig saw, a rasp and a router.
     
  14. Please do Ric5. I would love to see what you come up with.
     
  15. Gilmourisgod

    Gilmourisgod

    Jun 23, 2014
    Cape Cod MA
    Robert
    I tried cutting out some parts with a jigsaw, really tough to keep the blade square and straight I'm thick stock. I had to stay way outside my line and nibble my way back. They don't seem to work well for anything thicker than 3/4" thick.
     
  16. ctmullins

    ctmullins fueled by beer and coconut Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 18, 2008
    MS Gulf Coast
    I'm highly opinionated and extremely self-assured
    Those are my tools as well; no band saw. I rough-cut the neck using a jig saw. I cut the fingerboard to width on a table saw sled. Then I route the truss rod channel, glue the fingerboard on, and use a pattern bit to trim the neck to the fingerboard dimensions. This is before the fingerboard is radiused. Somewhere in there I thickness the headstock too, using my router and my belt sander (but there has to be a better way...).
     
  17. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    I love the concept!

    Regarding the upper horn, I'd tend to leave it at the original length, as it flows better as a body shape, and deal with the neck dive with light weight tuners and a heavy bridge.

    Sub'd.
     
  18. Gilmourisgod

    Gilmourisgod

    Jun 23, 2014
    Cape Cod MA
    I'm lucky in the tools and shop department, as I share space with my brother. Between us we have a tablesaw bandsaw, jointer, planer, mortiser and drill press. I am always impressed by people who do such outstanding work with a few basic power and hand tools, I tend to lean on the tools instead of developing better hand skills, my Achilles heel.
     
  19. ScarfFace

    ScarfFace Supporting Member

    Aug 23, 2014
    La Crosse WI
    That Truss rod cover inlay looks a lot like the 12th fret inlay on my old Peavey Cirrus.
     
  20. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    May 7, 2021

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.