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rickenbacker crooked pickup?!

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Thrasher, Mar 27, 2009.


  1. willsellout

    willsellout Supporting Member

    Aug 13, 2002
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Sweetwater Employee
    BTW I have a Ric on order, and have for the last year, so I'm not a hater. I got it for the old price though and expect, and am OK with, some flaws. IF there are no flaws, even better, but I'm better there will be;)
     
  2. Ric5

    Ric5 Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 29, 2008
    Colorado
    I grow organic carrots and they are not for sale
    Get used to it ... that is the way they build Rickenbackers ... the pickups are 1 or 2 degrees off square ... it does not effect the sound in any way ...
     
  3. Ric5

    Ric5 Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 29, 2008
    Colorado
    I grow organic carrots and they are not for sale

    Actually most of the work is done by machines. Back in the 70s and 80s there was a lot more hand-made processes going on but now the cnc machines and other machines do a lot of the work.
     
  4. GregShadoan

    GregShadoan

    Sep 1, 2008
    Oregon
    I absolutly love my rics. Cant imagine ever not having a ric in my stock. having said that, there are certainly QC/Design issues that are real. A very touchy subject in some circles. They are an addiction. I am sure I could spend 2K on a much better bass, but I just can't LOL. It's like ...... idk, im an addict. I have never had a bass, ric included, that I have not had to mess with to get it right(for me). Some more than others, but the OP's issue is IMHO a non issue. I personally think that it may be that the treble PU assy is still put together by human hands. The CNC has definitly added consistancy to the wood working, and the finish's are truly amazing. Even Jetglo can take your breath away. the fact is that they are a very small proud company, with a proud heritige, and have issues with denial. Still, they are one of the few iconic bass still out there, Hofner, Fender Jazz, Fender P, Gibby T-bird, etc.. Rics will always make the list. Maybe not the coolest whiz bang super duper handmade bass, but there is only one. The knock-offs are jokes IMO.
     
  5. pringlw

    pringlw

    Nov 22, 2008
    Seattle Area
    I'm not sure if you would see this or not with Lakland specifically but honestly who cares if you do. To me its kind of a funny thing to get troubled by. Some of the early production bodies in a manufacturing process are going to take a hit (a ding, whatever). A little bit of wood puddy and some sanding will make that completely invisible with a solid color instrument and none of this would affect the sound (unless it was a huge flaw or repair which I suspect any of these high end companies wouldn't do).

    I don't in fact have any solid color instruments, but if I did and ever sanded one down - no matter who the manufacturer - I would not be surprised to find some minor imperfection repairs in the wood.
     
  6. Take a look at all of the Fender basses that were sanded down in the 70's when natural and stained wood was a hit. This is regarded as a low QA period for Fender and I have yet to see one with wood putty. Ugly wood? Sure that is exactly what solid colors end up covering but replacing wood with putty is something that I find a little shocking.
     
  7. Roger Haworth

    Roger Haworth

    Mar 31, 2005
    Don't Fender use ash for their natural finish bodies, and alder for the paintjobs? Ash having the more attractive grain.

    I remember reading an interview with Chris Squire once when he said about his Ricky (made in 1963 or 64?) that the 'pick-ups are all crappy and cock-eyed, ... but that's what makes it so brilliant'.
     
  8. Jason Brown

    Jason Brown

    May 1, 2000
    SLC, UT
    Lakland did used to offer Duncan Basslines as an option on their -02 and -94 models.

    I had an '08 Rick that had a crooked pickup and the nut was cut way too high. I filed the nut myself and decided the pickup was something I could live with, but I was disappointed with what I received for my $1800.

    Seeing the recent price increases from other manufacturers, though, makes me realize that I'm that old man I never wanted to or thought I would become.



    Did you kids know I used to be able to buy a candy bar for 15 cents? :spit:


    Oh yeah, crooked pickups....you guys seen them Dingwalls? They got crooked everything! :bag:
     
  9. BurningSkies

    BurningSkies CRAZY BALDHEAD Supporting Member

    Feb 20, 2005
    Syracuse NY
    Endorsing artist: Dingwall Guitars
    Yes, but it's entirely intentional and no one ever accused Sheldon Dingwall of shoddy workmanship.
     
  10. willsellout

    willsellout Supporting Member

    Aug 13, 2002
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Sweetwater Employee

    This post made me LOL:D
     
  11. Bassgrinder77

    Bassgrinder77 Banned

    Jan 23, 2009
    Be shocked then. No company throws away a body (much less an entire instrument) because it has chips or dings - they ALL repair them with epoxy or wood putty. I've owned only one p-bass - it was a natural body that was originally black. It had epoxy and putty in places. I knew the guy who refinished it - the epoxy and filler were factory. It was in with the grain and really didn't look bad. Wake up and be shocked man.
     
  12. Bassgrinder77

    Bassgrinder77 Banned

    Jan 23, 2009
    That's called a DESIGN FLAW - a perfectly consistent defect on exactly every instrument coming off the line.
    But don't let the autistics on this thread see those poles not alligning exactly with the strings - they'll go berserk!



     
  13. Bassgrinder77

    Bassgrinder77 Banned

    Jan 23, 2009
    Boy, you've drunk the Kool-Aid.
    Hand picked, eh?
    By old-world bespectacled white-bearded craftsmen smoking pipes? Ah yes.
    Well, I hope these loving hand-pickers use their eyes too! The hands can miss a lot.
     
  14. Maybe I drank Kool Aid but I am pretty sure none of my new basses had sloppy crooked pickups. This Kool Aid tastes great!
     
  15. willsellout

    willsellout Supporting Member

    Aug 13, 2002
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Sweetwater Employee

    Kool aid aside, I doubt the Lakland crew would partake in that kind of thing (wood putty). I don't see how they could honestly since everything for their Skyline series is done overseas. I also doubt that the overseas factories have time to fill in a body and sand it. It would seem at that point it would be cheaper to toss the body. I definitely don't think they would do this on their US models, because I believe they respect their clientele.



    Dan
     
  16. Bassgrinder77

    Bassgrinder77 Banned

    Jan 23, 2009
    You not seeing it doesn't make it not so.
    You simply don't understand the manufacturing process.
    Every instrument has a "finish prep" stage in which the cut body or instrument is inspected and sanded. At this stage, any cracks, dings or chips are filled. Also, any softer, open grain woods like rosewood are rubbed with a paste-like filler to fill the grain (otherwise the finish just soaks into the grain or small cracks alike).
    This stage is necessary and isn't automated.
    And why would an overseas operation not do this?? Why do you think the operation is overseas? To tap into their wealth and history of electric bass manufacturing innovation? No. Overseas = CHEAP LABOR. Cheap labor pays off in LABOR INTENSIVE processes.
    NOBODY throws away a body or instrument with an imperfection that can be easily repaired with a little epoxy of putty.
     
  17. Grain filler like you are talking about is completely different than what the previous poster was talking about. He was talking about some serious damages. I have never seen a stripped Fender than had something similar to what he described. I "doubt" that Lakland would do what he was describing.
     
  18. Ric5

    Ric5 Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 29, 2008
    Colorado
    I grow organic carrots and they are not for sale
    I still like my Rics but I enjoy playing my jazz, and p-basses, and jag, and fenderbirds so much that I have actually been considering getting rid of all of my Rics ... The tapered fender necks feel better in my hands than the Ric necks ...
     
  19. Bassgrinder77

    Bassgrinder77 Banned

    Jan 23, 2009
    I brought the subject of epoxy and putty under solid colors up and I never said it was "serious". In fact, it's fairly common and not a big deal. It's cosmetic and that's why they get painted solid. You simply don't know what your talking about.
     
  20. willsellout

    willsellout Supporting Member

    Aug 13, 2002
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Sweetwater Employee
    And you saying it does is as baseless as my theory.

    How do you know me so well:eyebrow:? I actually do understand the process, have done it myself a few times. Which is one of the reasons I laugh at Rickenbackers "extra labor intensive finish" statement.

    I understand that, all of it in fact, surprise surprise;)


    When you are speaking about mass quantities of bodies, it's reasonable to assume that the time it would take to fill and sand a bass body might be more expensive that replacing the body. I'm not saying this is the case I'm saying it might be the case. Unless you have proof positive this takes place in the overseas factories neither of us are right or wrong. It most certainly doesn't put you in a position to tell anyone else that they don't know what they are talking about.
     

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