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Riedl model B?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by J.D.B., Mar 24, 2013.


  1. Just ran accross this oddbal on the bay: A Riedl model B that supposedly has some "new patented technology" for amplifying the strings. I can't find anything about it other than this ad. Any ideas? Maybe a microphone below that pickguard? They're asking a high dollar for this "new patented" instrument. I wonder what it is? The seller doesn't appear to be a company, either....Thoughts?

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Riedl-Elect...e-/130876024046?pt=Guitar&hash=item1e78d1a4ee

    Josh
     
  2. MUSHROOMSeAcOw

    MUSHROOMSeAcOw

    Aug 1, 2010
    Georgia
    That looks... risky, to say the least. What's up with bridge? There's nothing to hold down the strings; from what I see they look like they'll pop out at the drop of a hat.
     
  3. Definitely an oddball. I'm curious about the "patented technology", not in buying it. It appears to be the only one of it's kind, other than their "Model A" of which I can find NOTHING about, anywhere.
    Anyone else?

    Josh
     
  4. ctufankjian

    ctufankjian

    Sep 28, 2007
    Vermont
    Endorsing Artist: Unicornbass.se
    Strange indeed. It's "NIB", but the string silks look a bit haggard. I think the body shape looks hideous, but strangely, the fretboard looks pretty decent. I'm going to go ahead and say that the item description is both culty and grammatically obscure.
     
  5. ctufankjian

    ctufankjian

    Sep 28, 2007
    Vermont
    Endorsing Artist: Unicornbass.se
    ...Also, I'm not understanding how this pickup system is unique. It sounds like there are individual pickups for each string, but that's been done a few times...:eyebrow:
     
  6. cdef

    cdef

    Jul 18, 2003
    The neo magnets induce voltage in the strings themselves, rather than in a coil. This seems to be the same principle as in the Nilsen System (patented by a Norwegian engineer in 1952), although Riedl adds digital processing and noise suppression before the output.
     

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