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Right hand muting

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Guss, Dec 30, 2004.


  1. Can anybody give me some advice on the right hand muting technique Jaco talks about in his instructional video? I believe he used his pinky and ring finger on his right hand to mute the
    G and D strings, and his thumb to mute the E. Getting my pinky and ring fingers in correct position is a pain though, as they always seem to want to stay raised away from the strings. Advice?
     
  2. Joe P

    Joe P

    Jul 15, 2004
    Milwaukee, WI
    Oh-oh. Now it's time for someone to say "practice" again.

    Joe
     
  3. phxlbrmpf

    phxlbrmpf

    Dec 27, 2002
    Germany
    I'll have to agree with Joe P, after a while using both your right and your left hand to mute strings that shouldn't be ringing will come natural. Do you slap, by the way? Muting the right strings is even more important for slapping, which in turn, will help you improve your muting technique.
     
  4. Well I was planning on practicing. Was just wondering if there are any good exercises anyone had to offer
     
  5. MichaelScott

    MichaelScott

    Jul 27, 2004
    Moorpark CA
    If you want to keep your thumb on the pup:

    Playing G- you mute the E and A strings with your pinky and ring, leave the D unmuted.

    Playing D- you mute the E and A strings with your pinky and ring. mute the G with your left hand and be careful of harmonics. (your right hand is in the same position as it was for the G)

    Playing A- Mute the E with either your ring or pinky (I prefer pinky because I only have to add a finger instead of replacing two fingers when switching to D and G), Mute the G and D strings with your left hand and be careful of harmonics.

    Playing E- mute the G, D, and A strings with your left hand and be careful of harmonics.

    If you are cool with your thumb on the E string:

    Playing G- you mute E with your thumb by resting it on the string. mute the A with your pinky and the D with your ring finger.

    Playing D- you mute E with your thumb by resting it on the string. mute the A with your ring finger. Mute the G with your left hand and be careful of harmonics.

    Playing A- Mute the E with your thumb, mute the G and D strings with your left hand- be careful of harmonics.

    Playing E- Move your thumb off of the E string onto the pup and mute the G, D, and A strings with your left hand and be careful of harmonics.

    I prefer to keep my thumb on the pup and use my pinky on the E string. I just involves less finger movement but you might be more comfortable with your thumb on the E string:

    Here is a basic exercise:
    Quarter notes- start at 60 bmp and work up till you create fire with your fingers. Don't frett anything and remember to mute every string you are not playing with your right or left hand. Turn your tone up to pick up any harmonics you might accidently play so you can correct your left hand mute position.

    Also, You should pay careful attention to your pointer and middle fingers of the right hand when you are playing. Make sure they are alternating and if you normally start the exercise with your middle finger you should play it half the time starting with your pointer finger- and vice versa.

    EEEEAAAADDDDGGGG GGGGDDDDAAAAEEEE
    EEEEAAAADDDDGGGG GGGGDDDDAAAAEEEE
    GGAADDEEGGAADDEE EEDDAAGGEEDDAAGG
    EEGDAEEGDAEEGEDA GGEADGGEDADEGADE
     
  6. Whafrodamus

    Whafrodamus

    Oct 29, 2003
    Andover, MA
    I usually do my muting with my index and middle finger of my right hand (and the left too, but muting with both hands is as secure as you can be :cool: ). When I play a note with one finger, I mute it with the opposite. Weird technique, but hey... my hair justifies it.