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Ripper thickness help

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Andii Syckz, Jul 14, 2012.


  1. Andii Syckz

    Andii Syckz

    Jan 2, 2011
    Montreal
    Okay so i'm almost ready to start building and cutting etc. But i recently tried a 1980's gibson grabber and the body although it feels nice, the baseball bat neck throws me off in liking the body thickness. Any case, i'm building a gibson ripper from scratch and since the grabber and ripper have the same thickness of 1 1/4" i would like to make it thick enough but not so much as i still want to keep the string through option. So between 1 5/16" and 1 3/4" would be good. The g3 is 1 1/2". And i measured the thickness of my pbass copy which is exactly 1 3/4".

    So my question to you guys: What should be my maximum thickness in order to still be able to have a string through option on the bass?
     
  2. ctmullins

    ctmullins fueled by beer and coconut Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 18, 2008
    MS Gulf Coast
    I'm highly opinionated and extremely self-assured
    As thick as you want it. The Ripper/Grabber had 34.5" scale lengths, just a hair longer than Fender, but pretty close. This means that any string long enough to do string-through on a normal Fender will probably be long enough to do string-through on a Ripper/Grabber. You lose a half-inch if you choose to build it at 34.5", but even with a 1.75" body I'd think most strings are long enough to cover that. Or, if you want to be conservative, build it at 34". Or 34.5" with a 1.5" body. Or build it 35" with a 2" body, and order "extra-long-scale" strings. The choices are numerous.

    Edit: One other point - the neck thickness has almost nothing to do with the body thickness.
     
  3. Andii Syckz

    Andii Syckz

    Jan 2, 2011
    Montreal
    How do i lose half an inch? I am building the ripper at exact specs except for the body's thickness. And i'm pretty sure i'll just end up doing 1 1/2 thick for the 34 1/2 scale length.

    I know the neck's thickness has almost nothing to do with the body's thickness. It just felt awkward holding a baseball bat type neck when the body was really slim.
     
  4. ctmullins

    ctmullins fueled by beer and coconut Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 18, 2008
    MS Gulf Coast
    I'm highly opinionated and extremely self-assured
    To put it another way, the answer to this very direct question is simply a matter of the length of your desired strings, from ball-end to silk. If they measure 36", then you have enough to "spend" 34" on the scale length, and maybe 1.5" on the body thickness, with the additional 0.5" going towards compensation, saddle-to-string-through dimension on your bridge, etc. Or you could spend 34.5" on the scale length and 1" on the body thickness. If your strings measure 37" or more, then that should be enough for 34.5" scale length and a 2" body thickness.

    So what do your strings measure?

    (I know this isn't precisely right, because the additional string length due to compensation, plus the fact that the string will not bend at a preci
     
  5. Andii Syckz

    Andii Syckz

    Jan 2, 2011
    Montreal
    Extra long scale ernie ball strings. cause on flyguitars.com, for the ripper it says to string them through the body with extra long scale strings. But i'm doing the 34.5" scale length from end of bridge (where the strings pass through the body) all the way till the nut of the fretboard.
     
  6. jumbodbassman

    jumbodbassman Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 28, 2009
    Stuck in traffic -NY & CT
    Born Again Tubey
    with the 2 by 2 versus the fen der 4 in line you should be fine .
     
  7. Andii Syckz

    Andii Syckz

    Jan 2, 2011
    Montreal
    What would be different? 2-2 vs 4 in line
     

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