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Roger Waters on the Pompeii DVD

Discussion in 'Recordings [BG]' started by dkmonroe, Nov 20, 2003.


  1. dkmonroe

    dkmonroe

    Jul 3, 2002
    Atlanta, GA
    Has anyone other than me noticed that on the Pink Floyd Pompeii DVD (or VHS, as the case may be), Roger Waters appears to be creating the "spacey" noises in the background during the 2nd part of Echoes using a metal slide on his P-bass?

    Has anyone ever attempted this? Does it work under normal conditions, or do you have to be heavily amplified?
     
  2. Da_Niet

    Da_Niet

    Jan 23, 2003
    California
    That's very interesting, because, like over a year ago, I, too, was wondering how he created those sounds. It does look like he was sliding his fingers over the frets gently. But, as to what he was using, I don't know. I'm sure that he was only contributing to the other-worldly sounds, provided mainly by Gilmour and Wright. Anyways, that's a keen observation of you. Boy, musicians today aren't quite as compelling or imaginative(and resourceful) as the early Floyd were...........and others at that time.
     
  3. dkmonroe

    dkmonroe

    Jul 3, 2002
    Atlanta, GA
    It seems as though both Rick and Dave have their hands full during that part of the song - I can't remember now what they're doing exactly, but when I last saw it, I was thinking, "Rick can't possibly be doing what he's doing, and make those spacey noises at the same time!"

    Roger appears to have a metal slide in his right hand, just like Dave uses in Saucerful. It's really different! I agree, some of these old-school guys were a LOT more original and resourceful than today's musicians.

    Of course, one could argue that even the Floyd themselves aren't quite like they used to be, seeing as both Roger and the three-man Floyd have to tour with an army of backup musicians just to achieve what they used to 30 years ago with just four guys.
     
  4. Da_Niet

    Da_Niet

    Jan 23, 2003
    California
    I think that, for the time, coming out of the 60's, and into the very early 70's, rock music was actually being taken seriously for the first time. There was a certain open-mindedness, even in the record-making side of the industry, to let the musicians experiment. Sometimes the results were absolutely stunning, other times, the product was less than stellar. But, that didn't stop or hinder the creative process. Today, however, the recording artists are held with such a tight grip by the company men, to be a certain way, and leave little room for diversi-fication(because it's all about the money). It's sad, really. The musicians are out there........the creativity IS there, but only freely expressed in the Indie markets, and some derivatives of the progressive music genre. Hope-fully, the current pop and rock market will over-saturate itself, and people will want to hear more improvisatory and applied musicianship. Well, we can so, anyway.:)