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Roland V-drums Noise

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Sock Justice, Feb 26, 2003.


  1. Ok, this goes out to anyone who has played or been around Electronic drum kits, more specifically the high end Roland V-drums.

    How much unplugged noise do they really make? A sibling of mine has been researching them for months now, but can't find anything on how loud they actually are. Maybe his sleuthing isn't quite up to par, but he can't find any good accounts of this.

    It'd be nice to walk into a music store and hear how loud they are, but Alaska is known for bears defecating on your lawn, stealing your garbage/household pets, whalewatching, and Moose Nugget Jewelry, not musical convienience. So any information you guys out in Talkbassopolis can give me would be wonderful. I know a few people on the site own them...so if you can chime in, I'd be grateful.

    -Dave
     
  2. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    They make enough...however it is FAR FAR less than an acoustic set. And its a totally different type of noise. It is akin to those drummer "practice pads" in fact its almost identical. If your cousin hits really hard then it may get one someones nerves, but only if they are in the same room. generally a good solid wall will drown it out for the rest of the world...so If the kit is in your cousins room, and your cousins parents live down the hall, they won't hear him unless the doors are open and he's wailing.

    I highly recommend V-drums to anyone, If your cousin really has the inclination to become a great drummer, v-drums will enable him to practice for hours and hours and hours and not drive everyone around him off the wall. furthermore, the built-in midi songs and grooves, infinite sound capabilities and preset 50 kits are a major plus as well....if your cousin wants to play a samba he just needs to load an appropriate kit, if he wants to play some hip hop then he can load a different one.

    Another plus is the built in mixer, it can be pretty useful if you want to interface with a computer and record or plug in your bass to the drum computer and then run both of you into a PA.

    the downsides of course, are the price, the need for a good amplification system if he wants to gig with them, and you can't do some drum tricks(like using brushes or mallets) but you can simulate everything that you can't physically do.

    hope this helps
    -Wr
     
  3. It does Wrong Robot, it does. Thanks a lot:)

    The reason I need to know the volume is that he shares his living space with four roomates, and at least one of them is home at all times, thus making practice time nonexistent. He already has an acoustic set for gigs, he just needs something to practice on. The money isn't such an issue either, he's a full-time high school science and math teacher (not exactly the highest paid profession, but it beats minimum wage by miles), and is getting lots o' cash back on taxes, so no guilt on blowing that money.

    Any other thoughts or testimony about the noise level? Would it bother roomies?

    Once again thanks WR, I'm going to shoot him an e-mail with the link so he can read it himself. Looks like I may have a practiced drummer to play with soon.

    -Dave
     
  4. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    If it DOES bother his roommates then tell your cousin to invest in a couple feet of sound dampening material to place over whatever wall, or door, is most adjacent to the bothered individual.

    I doubt it will though, you generally can't hear V-drums that well when doors are closed.

    a good friend of mine decided to pick up the drums last year, I convinced him to get v-drums, he has been playing for about 14 months and he is already by far the best drummer in town. He describes his V-drums as "better than crack" not that he knows what crack is like, but he can assume. He basically sits there for 4-8 hours a day, doing rudiments...his sense of ryhthm is amazing, and his dedication is unreal. He broke his right wrist....so he learned how to play left handed:eek: now his cast is off and he is playing better than ever, either left handed or right handed.
     
  5. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    I live in an apartment and also worried over how much noise they make - don't want to bother my neighbours. I asked some of them to listen for noise and then I drummed away as much as possible for a short time. The people living in the flat below mine reported they could hear a small amount of noise, a tapping or clicking, my guess is hitting the rubber pads or hihat pad, and the kick, vibrates the drum stand and kick stand, and that goes down in the floor (their ceiling), even though I have tried to isolate with foam rubber and a think carpet. The net pads do not make enough noise to be heard outside of my apartment. The neighbours said they didn't mind, but still it makes me reluctant to practice too much.

    I want a free-standing house with a large basement for drum, bass and recording rooms... :)
     
  6. fastplant

    fastplant

    Sep 26, 2002
    Connecticut
    Yeah, the lady that lives under me complained ALOT about the kick drum. Although, she complained about pretty much everything. I'm moving into a house tomorrow so I won't have to worry about her anymore, but your naieghbors will not hear you at all, just anyone below you.
     
  7. Our three drummers like the kick, snare and toms on v-drums alright (they still complain about them not being acoustic), but those cymbals and the hat have to go. They're difficult to trigger (some of the presets) and they are like hitting Tupperware lids.

    Lots of cool presets, though, and they're flexible. All in all, less the cheesy cymbals, I think they're fine, and would permit you to practice without attracting the whales. ;)
     
  8. tuBass

    tuBass

    Dec 14, 2002
    Mesquite, Texas
    If this is just for a pratice set, he could get a drum set outfitted with just pads. Now it wouldn't be as nifty as using headphones with the roland set, but they fold up out of the way very nicely.

    Mark
     
  9. Thanks for the info guys.

    People under him isn't a concern, his room is right over the garage, so that's pretty nice.

    I told him that if he just wanted to practice, he should save his cash and get a practice pad set, but he wants something that he can have headphones with, and that feels much closer to a real drumset experience. So, hey, I told him to go for it. If that's what it takes to get him to play, and make him happy, I don't think they're too expensive at all.

    Thanks again for all the feedback...if anyone else would care to chime in, it surely wouldn't hurt.

    -Dave
     
  10. xush

    xush

    Jul 4, 2001
    mobile AL
    The mesh pads are quieter than the rubber ones, and the new cymbals feel better than using the rubber pads in my opinion.

    There is some noise, and I could see it disturbing 'overly sensitive' roommates...but it is a heck of a lot quieter than acoustics!

    The feel is quite different though; it takes some adjusting. The vdrums.com site has a lot of good suggestions for getting up to speed on them though.

    I love them! I wouldn't say they 'replace' acoustics, but they are great for gigging. Control over cymbal volume is worth the price alone to me...

    I saw a guy triggering cymbal samples with his, they sounded much better than the Rolands. I think I'm going to look into that route, they really sounded good! For now I'm making due with the the ones from the Roland module, but I do think they are the weak link in the whole V-drum chain.
     
  11. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    I find that the cymbals and hit hat are the shoddiest part of the kit. Save if you have the triple trigger cymbals, they still don't have the same feel, but they are still much much better.


    Another great things about v-drums, you can use the midi interface and trigger whatever the hell kind of samples you like, so as Xush mentioned, you COULD load in sampled cymbals, you could also load in a kit that is your cousin singing an A minor scale, and thats just fun.:D
     
  12. fastplant

    fastplant

    Sep 26, 2002
    Connecticut
    Very true, even the new cymbals are not like acoustic cymbals, but as far as the sound, I played around with the settings and eventually got some really nice sounds. The presets are awful and do not sound natural, but you can certainly make a drum set that will fool everyone. I have one set made on the kit that, when recorded, I haven't found a single person who doubted that it was an acoustic set. But as far as feel, there is only so much you can do with rubber and plastic. I'm sure in time Roland will pop out with a Vdrum set that sounds and feels exactly like an acoustic set. But for now I think the Vdrums are as close as you can get with an elec. set.
     
  13. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Thats another thing, when roland eventually does design some new pad system...you can always upgrade.
     
  14. xush

    xush

    Jul 4, 2001
    mobile AL
    yeah, for a price! heh... :p
    Although they are offering the upgrade on the TDW1 chip for free.

    I bought into the whole V hype, I've got a V-everything! And for the most part I like them, but I guess I got into it knowing that every couple of years they'd come out with something new. It's kind of like most technologies. Your stuff doesn't become 'obsolete' so much as there's just nicer, newer stuff available. Oh well, that's the way it goes.
     
  15. fastplant

    fastplant

    Sep 26, 2002
    Connecticut
    Haha, true, I got mine just to jam around on for fun, but I actually started playing it out with an acoustic band for a bit and it worked awesome for that, nice low volume compared to an acoustic set. But for now I use it just for fun.

    Anyone else prefer the rubber heads to the mesh heads? I do. Not sure why, I guess cuz I play a bit hard.
     
  16. xush

    xush

    Jul 4, 2001
    mobile AL
    I've been reading on Vdrums.com how some folks have gotten a better feel from Hart 2-ply heads, or have made other adjustments to their Roland mesh heads to get a tighter feel. Supposedly they've gotten them much closer to feeling realistic. Most claim you can tighten the heads 'much more' than Roland claims is safe...