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Roundcore difference?

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by iceblinko, Oct 26, 2004.


  1. iceblinko

    iceblinko

    Jul 15, 2003
    Ny
    hey all. i'm just wondering what the basic differences are between strings made with a roundcore and regular (i think it's called hexcore?) strings. also... what are some good roundcore strings? thanks!..
    -tom
     
  2. PhatBasstard

    PhatBasstard Spector Dissector Supporting Member

    Feb 3, 2002
    Las Vegas, NV.
    Actually "Hexcore" is the newer innovation (although years old now). They found that a Hexcore helps keep the wraps from slipping because the edges of the Hex dig into the wraps.
    Don't believe the new "Roundcore is better, more mass in contact" hype. It ain't true. It's just marketing. For a roundwound string, a Hexcore will always be more stable (and less prone to Dead String/Slipped Winding Syndrome) than a Roundcore string.
     
  3. The 'classic' roundcore string is DR High Beams. Very easy playing string but thin sounding, so the 'more mass' thing doesn't help lows right away. Fat Beams have more lows though (maybe there's more fundamentals with roundcore, dunno - but in the mix HB's sound thin, so I guess the FB's get their lo-end punch from a thicker core. They feel stiffer anyway). Played both a lot, and never had a problem with windings slipping from the core. So bassically don't pay attention to the sales jibberish whether it's roundcore, frozen, slow wound or handmade strings. Your taste in strings shouldn't change because of the way the strings are made. Just find the ones you like the most. Takes some time, but it's worth it. But I gotta say that High Beams feels different from any other string, and I believe it's due to the roundcore. Flexible in a very natural way, not just like thinner gauge strings. But not enough low end and punch for my taste.
     
  4. PhatBasstard

    PhatBasstard Spector Dissector Supporting Member

    Feb 3, 2002
    Las Vegas, NV.
    Many members on TB have complained of dead DR strings. Meanwhile, I've used D'Addarios, about 350 sets since the 80s, which are hexcore and never had a single dead string...even after numorous cleanings/re-stringings (where windings would begin to slip, if at all) of the same string set. Haven't seen anybody on this site complain about them either.
     
  5. rsautrey

    rsautrey Banned

    Jul 27, 2000
    I think the fact that DR strings are "handmade" accounts for an occassional dud, maybe more than the machine made string manufacturers, i.e. D'Addario. With that said, I've used DR strings since 1999 and have encountered a few bad strings. I've had 3 bad stainless steel Lo-Rider "E" strings and 1 bad stainless steel Fat-Beam "E" string. DR have always been more than helpful with these problems, sending me a new set each time. I also use their acoustic strings and haven't had any issues. I used to use D'Addario strings on my bass and guitar and had a few issues with these as well. I had 1 nickelplated XL "E" string that was DOA and I had several phosphor bronze acoustic strings that were either DOA or had weird vibrations and overtones. D'Addario was just as helpful as DR with these issues. The biggest point I'm trying to make is that I've had more problems with the hexcore Lo-Riders (which I prefer) than the other DR sets that are roundcore.
     
  6. iceblinko

    iceblinko

    Jul 15, 2003
    Ny
    thanks for the responses guys! i was just curious because the Fender Super bass strings (8250 roundcore) that i use have a very unique and SMOOTH feel to them. the sound is pretty unique as well...lots of punch, growl and a VERY round even tone (highs, mids and lows are all very prominent). so i'm just assuming that these characteristics are because of the roundcore.

    the only thing that i don't like about these strings is that the E string (which is taperwound, but i don't mind that TOO much) is a 110 gauge while the rest are 45, 65 and 85. this gives an "uneven" feeling when i play, which i really notice when i play other basses. i guess this is making me look for a similar replacement, and if i don't find strings that i like i'll just switch back to the Fenders (or go to the factory and force them to make a 105 gauge!!).

    once again, thanks for the responses, and if anyone can further help my quest, it would be greatly appreciated!
    laters...

    -tom
     
  7. PhatBasstard

    PhatBasstard Spector Dissector Supporting Member

    Feb 3, 2002
    Las Vegas, NV.
    As far as the first issue, I too tried a set of the Bronze strings and thought they were crap from the get-go. When I refer to the "350 sets" I'm talking mostly XL70s 4, 5, 6 string sets in both regular long scale and super long scales.

    As far as the second issue goes, I think your point of them being "Hand Made" is probably correct. As most people in the industry would agree, of all the things you might want "Hand Made", a string isn't one of them. If there was ever a product that cried out for the consistancy of computer controled/monitored machinery...round wound strings are it.
     
  8. Rowka

    Rowka Supporting Member

    Dec 9, 2002
    Jacksonville, FL
    All else being equal, the geomety of the core effects the stiffness (perceived tension) of the string. A round-cored string will feel looser while a hex-cored string will feel stiffer, tighter.
     
  9. Check out Thomastek-Infeld (TI) strings. These use round cores. They are very low tension. Some like 'em, some don't (many do). I just put on my first set of TI Jazz Flats, and they are incredible. A bright flat but with some woody, organic, almost upright tones. Also checkout the DudePit site on www.vintagebass.com for more discussions about TI strings. Also do a search here - you'll find alot of TI supporters.
     
  10. The DR Fatbeams are round core as mentioned above. The low end is not as defined as with the DR Low Rider which is a hex core.