Rounds for a flatwound player

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by FatCity, Oct 31, 2003.

  1. FatCity


    Apr 30, 2002
    Lexington, SC
    Endorsing Artist: Howard's Crispy Fried Chicken Skins
    I have recently started playing with a new group and the music is a bit harder edged than I have played in the past. I have always been a flatwound guy, currently using Rotosound Jazz flats on my Jazz bass. It is time for a new set of strings anyways, so I thought I would try a set of rounds, but would like some reccomendations. I recently played a bass with DR Sunbeams on it and hated the tone and the fingernoise; is there a roundwound that is not quite as "round"? Having always played flats, I have never had to worry about finger noise. Any feedback would be appreciated.

    Thanks in advance,
  2. jacove


    Apr 12, 2003
    Aalborg, Denmark
    thomastik infeld makes a great roundwound which is very "flatish", just be prepared for low tension...
  3. PhilMan99


    Jul 18, 2003
    US, Maryland
    I'd never go back to round-wounds (I use TI Jazz Flats), but I found a couple that I liked somewhat before I switched back to flats (still had that "piano" sound):

    * Elixir - has a plastic coating which reduce finger-noise and high-end. Marketed as "longer lasting".

    * DR "Fat Beams" - Big ol' fat/warm sound.
  4. jdombrow

    jdombrow Supporting Member

    Jan 16, 2002
    Colorado Springs, CO
    You could try some compression wound strings or "half-rounds". These are round wound strings that are either compressed or machined during (or after) the winding process to give them a smooth finish similar to a flat wound string.

    The Elixers might be a good solution also.

  5. mobax

    mobax Supporting Member

    Dec 31, 2002
    New Baltimore, MI
    D'Addario 1/2 rounds may work for you.
  6. FatCity


    Apr 30, 2002
    Lexington, SC
    Endorsing Artist: Howard's Crispy Fried Chicken Skins
    Thanks for the replies- I appreciate the feedback!

  7. these are great strings that arent too hard on the wallet, i recently got a set to see how they sound, and i myself have been a hardline flat player for as long as i've been playing. after a few weeks of playing on them, i found they lost a lot of the roundwound zing they have when first put on, they keep the flatwound thump but add a little more punch than the thud of a flat. i really like these things, and it seems like they're getting better with age :p
  8. RicPlaya


    Apr 22, 2003
    Whitmoretucky MI
    D'addario slowwounds are smooth but has a little edge to them, never tried half wounds. Have you tried the DR low rider nickels? They will be deeper in tone and less finger noise than the sunbeams.
  9. Nice description between the sounds, I may use this to explain myself to others!

  10. 59jazz

    59jazz Infinite Rider on the Big Dogma Supporting Member

    FC, I've been a long time RW player, I now favor flats. You may want to check out the GHS Pressure Wounds. They feel flat and produce a flat bottom end with RW type mids and top end, plus they're loud to boot........nice medium tension too.

  11. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    I just re-strung with D'Addario half rounds on one of my J's and like them. Got maybe 10 or 12 hours of playing time on them so they are settled in but stil in the new string phase. For my taste they need another dozen hours before they'll be worth committing to tape, err disk.

    No where as boingy as the Roto's that came off it. More meat but still an aggressive Round Wound sound. The bass itself is Swamph Ash, Bad Ass II, Duncan SJB1's and the pre from a MIA Deluxe. I've been struggling with that one to find the right string combo for it and these are the best yet.

    I really need both flats and rounds in my quiver. Can't see myself using just 1 set of strings. I'm having a hard enough time limiting myself to just one set of fretted flatwounds. I like the Chromes on my fretless so much I'm really tempted to pick up another J and try them fretted ... can't give up the raw thump of Fender flats though ... so many strings, so little time, sigh ...