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Run outta room for bridge adjustment

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Masher88, Sep 28, 2005.


  1. Masher88

    Masher88 Believe in absurdities and you commit atrocities

    May 7, 2005
    Cleveland, OH
    Have you ever set the intonation on your bass and you run outta screw on the bridge? I was setting up my 5 string and the B string is just about set, but I had to crank the screw so that the saddle is all the way back on the bridge. I actually had to remove the spring so I could take it back a bit further. It's darn close to be intonated, but should it be this drastic of an adjustment? I switched to a light gauge B string (.120). Could this be the result of that change in string thickness? The strings go thru the body by the way.
     
  2. Yep. It's that way with my current 5 string and was the same way with my previous 5. :meh:
     
  3. superfly

    superfly

    Aug 4, 2004
    Might be a bad string too. I changed out some strings recently and the E wouldn't intonate, even with the saddle cranked all the way back. I put the old E back on & it intonated right up.
     
  4. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2002
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Yeah, I've had E and B strings both run out of room. I actually replaced the bridge saddle tension spring with a shorter one for a couple extra millimeters! When setting intonation, I'll jam my thumb down at the string / saddle junction to improve the "break"

    Riis
     
  5. Masher88

    Masher88 Believe in absurdities and you commit atrocities

    May 7, 2005
    Cleveland, OH
    Does doing this help with the intonation?
     
  6. Masher88

    Masher88 Believe in absurdities and you commit atrocities

    May 7, 2005
    Cleveland, OH
    That's weird that it seems alot of people are having the same problem...I would figure that the bridge makers would allow more room if this is happening a lot. I have a G&L L-2500 Tribute by the way. It's not some cheapo bass that's giving me a headache. I figure for aourn 550 bucks, a bass should at least be in tune! :smug:
     
  7. Juneau

    Juneau

    Jul 15, 2004
    Dallas, TX.
    You might just try twisting the string in the saddle so a different part of the string is touching the bridge. I've had this happen during setups, almost always on low stings, and thats usually what I have to do to get it intonated properly.
     
  8. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    I've had this problem on every five string I have ever owned. The only solution that I have found is to use a taper-wound or exposed-core B string. They have always intonated perfectly in every case.
     
  9. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2002
    Virginia Beach, VA
    It helps to a degree. I believe I found the tip on a luthier's website. The mashing bit does prevent the string from doing a "lazy loop" as it passes over the string saddle.

    FWIW, I'm doing my set-ups with a Peterson tuner so I'm pretty much splitting hairs in some cases.

    Riis
     
  10. There's a thread here somewhere where someone has "extended" the anchor point of his be string by using a brass ferrule.

    While this doesn't change the witness point, it WILL help shed some of the tension BEHIND this witness point which COULD help in intonation...look it up and give it a try, anyway.