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S1 switching?

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by anonymous278347457, Jan 15, 2006.


  1. anonymous278347457

    anonymous278347457 Guest

    Feb 12, 2005
    ive seen some american jazz/precision basses that have this
    from what ive seen it switches between series and parrallel right?

    Im currently choosing between a standard MIM jazz and a thunderbird. so i was wondering if i could get a more metal/rock tone out of a jazz bass with series wiring or switching
     
  2. anonymous278347457

    anonymous278347457 Guest

    Feb 12, 2005
    bumpety bump bump
     
  3. alibloke

    alibloke

    Dec 17, 2004
    Bristol, England
    The short answer 'yes', there is loads of info about it in the FAQ section. :)

    Do you play mainly metal/rock? If so, the thunderbird does that very well. However, a series/parallel j bass would offer alot more versatility if you play a wide variety of styles.
     
  4. David Wilson

    David Wilson Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Lower Westchester, NY
    I'm not sure if the question is whether a jazz with series switching can get more of a metal tone than a Thunderbird.
    I can't answer that question, but a Jazz in series mode will give a more Precision like sound - great for pick playing.
     
  5. anonymous278347457

    anonymous278347457 Guest

    Feb 12, 2005

    damn before i didnt read that properly and i got really excited.

    hehe.

    precision is always good.
     
  6. I honestly dont like the S1 switching. It just gives a cheaper feel to the nobs and I really dont see the need. A jazz bass does a jazz sound, and should do a jazz sound. I play a P bass for my metal/hardcore/post hardcore/emo/metalcore stuff, but honestly, one of my favorite sounds is a straight up Fender Jazz Bass in this style of music.

    A jazz bass gives a nice throaty sound, it can dig in pretty deep, and can sound very thick. This is especially good if you are looking for a dirty, grindy sound. I have heard many jazz basses do this very well (think of The Dillinger Escape Plan, although they are extremely heavy and such, he uses a Fender Jazz, and in Standard tuning at that). I say go for the Mexican Jazz if that is what you can afford, it is extremely versitile, as you can play ANY style of music with it.
     
  7. klocwerk

    klocwerk

    May 19, 2005
    Somerville, MA
    Great. You go buy 5 basses with a single 'sound' each then. Those of us with budgets will continue getting MULTIPLE sounds out of a single bass! what a concept...

    I did the S1 mod on my MIM fender jazz (fretless). I really like it although I don't use it much in a band situation. It's a meatier tone, closer to a P than a standard J sound, but still sort of somewhere in between. If I were limited to a single budget bass it would probably be a Jazz with an S1 mod.

    I feel compelled to point out for crazybassist601, that since it's a switch you can turn it off and have your standard J tones with absolutely no change from before the mod.
     
  8. Max

    Max Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2000
    Bakersfield, CA
    I play in two different clubs with poor accoustics and when I debuted my MIA Jazz with the S-1 engaged: viola. It was the perfect mix. Growly mids that cut through and that warm bottom end that comes from a P. When I try and play my P again (which ultimately is my favorite tone) the other band members tell me they like the jazz better.

    The knobs do feel a little cheap but it's a Fender and it's going to be an easy fix if it ever breaks.
     
  9. Nedmundo

    Nedmundo Supporting Member

    Jan 7, 2005
    Philadelphia
    I have Jazz and Precision basses with the S-1 switch, so I'm experienced with this. On the Jazz with the S-1 engaged for series, the tone fattens up a bit, the highs pull back a little, and the output jumps a couple of db's. It basically converts the two single coils into a series humbucker, so there's no noise and the neck volume pot changes to master volume. It sounds more like a P than a traditional J, but due to different pickup spacing and configuration it can't possibly duplicate the P-bass tone.

    Whether this is better for metal or hard rock is a matter of taste. My initial inclination would be "yes" because of the heavier bottom and higher output, but I agree with crazybassist601 that a regular J is actually great for hard rock. And when I think back, I always preferred the straight J tone when I played hard rock (Cult, Zeppelin, original punkish stuff), and almost never used the S-1.

    And I've never used it since I got some noiseless Lindy Fralin pickups. The S-1 does practially nothing to the tone now, and the bottom is so heavy I don't care. I've played serious hard rock with it, and it's great. In fact, I'd say a great set of noiseless pickups provides more useful tonal variation than the S-1, but of course they're more expensive.
     
  10. I put the series mod on my inexpensive Yamaha RBX170. It is a P/J, and it sounds pretty darn nice as a P and as a P/J. and with the series switch engaged, the sound is significantly thicker with a greater compliment of low and mid frequencies without sacrificing much in the area of clarity.

    I use my bass 90% of the time in this mode as it fits what I'm playing.

    for a $10 pot and a bit of solder, I've been able to give this bass another dimension in sound.

    I only play fingerstyle, but I have made some felt picks for myself and picked this bass would suit a lot of heavy rock stuff.
     
  11. I've got a 2001 MIM jazz that didn't come with the S1 feature so I rewired it with an inexpensive micro-toggle switch in between the volume knobs. Gives a fantastic P bass tone with the versatility of the standard jazz tones.

    I highly recommend this mod, it cost me less than $8 to do. Recently I've fattened it up even more by putting on new 5 string strings.

    Now its tuned BEAD and I did'nt have to to do anything to the nut or the bridge. Need to adjust the neck tho, will have to that when the weather levels off here.