Saddle groove shape?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by dTune, Oct 6, 2004.

  1. dTune


    Feb 28, 2004
    I noticed a weird thing on my bass, the saddle grooves are "V"-shaped.

    I'm thinking that the nut grooves are filed round, to the shape of the string, but the saddle isn't, and this could cause the vibration not to transfer so well through the bridge, and I'm having sustain problems.

    Actually, the grooves on the saddle are more shaped like "oo", the string going on top of the two o's. And the strings touch the saddles in two points, and I'm thinking the strings should have more area against the saddle.

    How should the saddle grooves be shaped? I tried to search a previous thread of this but couldn't find one..
  2. Great question!

    It's perfectly OK to have a V grooved saddle as long as it's deep enough to securely hold the string. The contact area should be between 8 and 9 o'clock and 3 and 4 o'clock. This will transfer energy completely. The shape you describe with the string sitting in the valley between 2 circles might not be deep enough. Check closely. I bet this is part of your prob. Nuts are usually cut with gauged round files. I'm guessing because of esthetics.
  3. dTune


    Feb 28, 2004
    I checked it and the grooves probably aren't deep/wide enough for the thicker strings.

    The saddle made quite irrationally, all the grooves are similar, the G string has the same size groove as the B. No wonder the B string sounds quite muffed and lacks sustain... It contacts the saddle around 5 and 7 o'clock.

    So, if I would file the groove(s) deeper, how big should the angle be? I guess it would be better not to make it all V-shaped, that would make the groove so deep (at least with the contact points in the 4 and 8 o'clock the angle is 60 degrees..). And is there anything else to remember, so that I won't mess up something critically important? :)