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Sadowsky popularity question

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by barroso, Jul 12, 2002.


  1. barroso

    barroso

    Aug 16, 2000
    Italia
    I was surfing on the Sadowsky website and GASing about some of their wonderful basses. i play both bass and guitar so i took a look at their guitars too. My question is: is a personal sensation or Sadowsky basses are way more popular than Sadowsky guitars? Why? I mean there are a lot of builders that do what Sadowsky do but only in the guitar market: Melancoln, Tom Anderson, but no one seems interested in the bass market, except Sadowsky... why?
     
  2. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    What?

    Are you asking why only Sadowsky is producing high end basses?

    Im confused.

    Peace
    Nick
     
  3. barroso

    barroso

    Aug 16, 2000
    Italia
    i am asking if Sadowsky basses are more popular than Sadowsky guitars and why.

    thanks;)
     
  4. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    Oh sorry.:D

    Im guessing its just that bassist are more demanding when it comes to their gear. I dont see as many truly custom shops and builders for guitars as I do for basses, but I dont look around as much.

    It could also be that sadowski guitars are just another pretty strat ripoff, while their basses are revolutionary jazz bass, with more merits than its predecessor.

    Then again, Ive never touched a Sadowsky, so what the hell do I know?!:)

    Peace
    Nick
     
  5. JPJ

    JPJ

    Apr 21, 2001
    Chicago, IL
    Since I'm a drummer, bassist, and guitar player, I have a unique perspective about how different musicians react to gear. As a rule, drummers and bass players (with bass players leading the pack by a large margin) are far more open to new products, technological innnovations, and changes in gear that are just plain different than the equipment and designs that have come before. Guitarists, as a group, are VERY traditional. Look at the bassists we play. While a lot of us (myself included) are early '60's Fender jazz fanatics, the vast majority of bassists these days are playing extended range instruments with multi-laminate necks and bodies made of exotic hardwoods...not to mention the wild active electronics most modern basses have. Take a look at the performance we get out of modern solid state or hybrid amp designs and the power handling of modern speaker cabs.
    Guitarists, on the other hand, are still craving anything with a tube in it, and will shy away from anything that not only doesn't "look" like a Strat, Tele, or Les Paul...but ISN'T a guitar made by one of these manufacturers. My guess is that Roger makes GREAT guitars, but the audience/market just isn't interested in something new, better, or "modern". It doesn' touch them and inspire them the same way a Les Paul would remind them of Jimmy Page or a two-tone sunburst strat reminds them of Buddy Holly or SRV.
     
  6. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Thank ya, JPJ, for hitting the nail on the head. Building solid body guitars just, flat out, isn't that interesting to many luthiers. I just had an email yesterday from a fine luthier who said making archtops is about the only thing that turns him on these days.

    - As Rick Turner said, "Bass players were more interested in a new, clear, approach, whereas guitar players seemed satisfied with what they had."

    - As Ned Steinberger said of bassists, "They're not so satisfied of with their instruments...they're not so well established...I think guitar players like to have a lot of different guitars," (some Talkbass members nonwithstanding), " and don't necessarily want to spend that much on them, whereas a bass player's more likely to have just one or two instruments and put everything he's got into those."

    Another Factor: The bass market is a midget compared to the guitar market. The guitar market cannot depend on a reliable supply of high quality, exotic woods. Given the much larger size of the guitar market, that factor tends to keep makers focused on the tried and true..."stay with the one who brung ya to the dance."

    Nonetheless, I may throw-up if I have another audition with a chord-slamming guitarist using a CBS/post-CBS Strat run through a Marshall and a Roland multieffect board!!
     
  7. JPJ hit the nail on the head.

    I'm a guitar player for over 20 years and picked up bass a few years ago. I have Sadowsky guitars and basses.

    Other than JPJ's comments, I don't know why the Sadowsky guitar isn't as popular as other super strats like Anderson, Melancon, Suhr, etc. Maybe it's simply lack of aggressive marketing? Those guys have a few more options which actually turned me off. Anderson has so many neck shapes and pickups. How the heck do I now what V, D, and C shaped means to my hands?! I tried 'them all' and chose Sadowsky. No regrets since. Since I got my second Sadowsky guitar I sold all my PRS (10) and Fender except for my first PRS which I bought in '89.

    Since 1990 I've purchased three Sadowsky guitars and one Sadowsky bass; a second Sadowsky bass is under construction as we speak. Needless to say, I think they are the finest electric guitars and basses I've played.
     
  8. JPJ

    JPJ

    Apr 21, 2001
    Chicago, IL
    I've always been fascinated by the differences between bass players, drummers, guitarists, etc. I find it extremenly interesting that as a bass player, when I look for bass equipment, I am very open and interested in "what's new'. While I'm primarily a Fender Jazz Bass fan, I'm in the process of building a Fendowsky from parts, love what Rob Allen can do piezo technology, check the FBB and Benensee sites weekly, and have contemplated purchasing everything from a Carl Thompson to a Smith to a Rick Turner to a custom neck-through made up of exotic hardwoods and active electronics.
    However, when I'm in a "guitar mode", I'm only interested in something that looks exactly like a Les Paul or a Telecaster. Forget exotic hardwoods, active electronics, or nifty new hardware! If a Dreadnought doesn't have an adirondak spruce top and brazilian back and sides....I'm not interested. Lacewood might make a great acoustic, but it just doesn't move me.
    I'm absolutely convinced that Roger Sadowsky makes a great Strat copy. However, if you are neither appealing to the 'ole school vintage crowd or the few pioneers who will experiment with something completely out there, then there is a propensity to get lost in the middle. Based on the traditional look of the Sadowsky and the fact that it pushed the boundaries of all things traditional, I'd guess that he is lost in the middle and just doesn't trigger that spark of passion with his guitars as he does with bass players.
     
  9. pigpen02

    pigpen02

    Mar 24, 2002
    although i've never checked out sadowsky guitars, i'm willing to wager that they too are very expensive, and i think that's probably a factor here as well.

    except for vintage buffs, it seems to me that guitarists get off cheaper than bassists, and can get much more passable to high end gear for less money. maybe that's a turn off, paying thousands for a guitar from a company that is know for their basses.
     
  10. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny

    Jan 19, 2002
    NY / NJ / PA
  11. I've never heard of nor tried the Callaham guitars. I know Sadowsky does offer their tremelo on his Strat type instruments.

    However, I think the Sadowsky guitars are not recreations of classic pre-CBS Fenders but a modernization and steroid-infused version similar to his basses.

    I could have bought a vintage strat. I tried a few but I'd have to add a 5-way switch, locking tuners, good tremelo, shield the cavity, and deal with the hum of vintage single coils. To do that to a vintage Fender would devalue it faster than you can say Arthur Andersen. For much less money than vintage strat and about the same price as a Fender Custom shop I get, IMHO, a superlative guitar with all the features I mentioned above, a great playing neck, Sadowsky guitar preamp (not the same as the bass pre), and some custom wiring which I spec'd out.

    You can see the pictures of my two guitars in my photo link below.