Sanding back of bass neck

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Stagelab, Jun 22, 2020.

  1. Stagelab

    Stagelab

    Dec 26, 2015
    Brooklyn, NY
    I’m going to sand down the back of my Mustang’s neck. Might go down to raw wood but not sure yet. Gonna use 800 or 1000 grit wet dry sandpaper.

    If I go down to bare wood, which oil do you recommend applying to seal the wood? Just a little amount? Let it sit for a few min and then wipe it off?
     
  2. RSBBass

    RSBBass

    Jun 11, 2011
    NYC
    I have had good results with true oil. Do a search on "speed necks" and you will get a lot of information.
     
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  3. Lownote38

    Lownote38

    Aug 8, 2013
    Nashville, TN
    Oil does not seal a neck. I would be careful going down to the bare wood and not using a real sealer on it. I mean, is it sticky? You can always rough it up a bit to get a faster feel. I've seen many guitars and basses ruined by people trying to do what you're suggesting. Just be careful.
     
  4. Stagelab

    Stagelab

    Dec 26, 2015
    Brooklyn, NY
    I hear ya. This is something I've researched a lot. I've watched 4 videos. I think if I use 1000 grit I can finesse it one swipe at a time. It's sticky. It's a road worn Fender and Fender told me they're normally satin'd but mine looks and feels like it got half the treatment.
     
  5. bassdude51

    bassdude51 "You never even called me by my name." Supporting Member

    Nov 1, 2008
    Central Ohio
    Use steel wool. Maybe #00. Put about 4 coats of Gun Stock Oil on it after your done getting it down to bare wood. It'll be like the back of a EB MM bass.
     
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  6. JeezyMcNuggles

    JeezyMcNuggles Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2018
    Santa Maria, CA
    I suck, but nobody really notices
    320 grit. You're gonna be there for quite a while if not. Then hit it with some steel wool. 000. Then a coat of tung oil. I do it on all my basses.
     
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  7. JeezyMcNuggles

    JeezyMcNuggles Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2018
    Santa Maria, CA
    I suck, but nobody really notices
    Well, ernie ball has a vat. They dip one coat of gun stock oil. Straight dip. Crazy right?
     
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  8. arbiterusa

    arbiterusa

    Sep 24, 2015
    SoCal
    Anything I gig with has raw wood on the neck. It's not advisable, hell, I do finish work so it's not like I don't have the means to do it...but I like the feel of the raw wood.
     
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  9. RSBBass

    RSBBass

    Jun 11, 2011
    NYC
    If you use steel wool, remove the neck first. The particles get on pickups and are close to impossible to remove.
     
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  10. Lownote38

    Lownote38

    Aug 8, 2013
    Nashville, TN
    Roadworn finishes are never satin. They are aged nitro, and that will be sticky. Use a Scotch Brite pad. Does the same work as the steel wool, but without the metal shavings. It's also less invasive than sandpaper.
     
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  11. rudy4444

    rudy4444

    Mar 13, 2012
    Central Illinois
    Read my comments in this topic relating to reproducing the Warwick "waxed neck" finish:

    Warwick-style wax-only finish

    Tru-oil will seal, but it will end up being a surface film if you apply multiple coats, then you're back to where you started.

    Doing the true "speed neck" finish while still protecting the neck against humidity change and/or soiling of the neck can be problematic. My recent experiments with the Osmo Poly-x product related in my comments have been highly successful for me.

    Beware of sanding beyond 220 if you expect any finish application to permeate the wood surface. If you sand beyond 220 then the surface will self-seal and you'll inhibit the surface from being able to absorb any finish you might wish to use. If you want to super-polish the surface then do the finish regimen first sanded to 220 and switch to finer grades after curing if you think it's necessary.

    I'd advise skipping the extra sanding, buffing with 0000 steel wool if you really want that skating rink feel.
     
  12. Eddie LeBlanc

    Eddie LeBlanc

    Oct 26, 2014
    Beaumont, Texas
    Don't create no problem, won't be no problem.
    I have a Spector bass that someone refinished with Polyurethane. It was always a problem to play because of the Poly finish.

    It was sanded down to bare wood, smoothed with differing grades of Scotch-Brite pads. I cleaned it with 90% alcohol. Then hand rubbed several coats of Danish Oil to seal. Wait for a day between coats. Lightly buff with lightest grade Scotch Brite pad between each coat.

    If I remember I put on 6 or so coats. It is now sealed and plays like butter.

    Steel wool is a no-no. Use the Scotch-Brite sanding pads.
     
  13. Paulabass

    Paulabass

    Sep 18, 2017
    All my Fenders were brought down to the wood. 320 grit, then 600, then 000 steel wool. 2 coats of gunstock oil, then reapply once a year as need.