Say Herro to my rittle fren...

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Hambone, Dec 4, 2005.

  1. From the CBE (Crude But Effective) Skunkworks of the Tool Division of Hambone Custom Basses :D ...

    The SCARFACE scarf cutting machine. I finished it today and it works just like I intended. This is a fixed angle at 11º because I didn't want to overcomplicate it the first time but adjustability is very easy to add on. I built it because I don't have the means to make a perfect scarf joint with my current tooling so I cut a rough angle with the table saw and do the leveling with this. It will also cut a full scarf but it takes quite a few passes. It's just quicker and more economical to rough it out with something else.

    The base is (2) 3/4" pieces of Sintra glued together. The walls are 5/8" MDF and the sliding track and neck tray are aluminum. The new base for the planer is 1/4" phenolic. There is one wood clamp showing but I have 3 in case. The little side clamp thing is to keep the vibration from ruining the cut when the wood gets thin. The knob is burl maple with a TruOil finish and an epoxy cap. The other end is an aluminum slug that I cut and polished like I would one of my knob projects. The vacuum works so well that there aren't any chips and next to nothing in the way of dust coming from the cutter. I aided the flow by doing some surgery under the nose where the elevator plate was mounted.

    The name and logo came to me about 3 hours ago and it's perfect for the piece. It's the first time I've named a tool creation but that's what it is from now on. :D BTW, the piece in the machine is the last test piece I cut before declaring the thing finished.

  2. what exactly does it do???

  3. I built a similiar thingie that works w/a router; I also rough-cut w/either a table- or bandsaw & finish w/the jig. Mine doesn't look as nice, though...
  4. Rodent

    Rodent Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 20, 2004
    Upper Left Corner (Seattle)
    Player-Builder-Founder: Regenerate Guitar Works
    way too cool Hammy!

    Maybe my Christmas wish will be for a three day 'vacation' at your shop discussing tooling and creative new ways to accurately do things that we usually fudge into submission.

    All the best,

  5. NJL


    Apr 12, 2002
    San Antonio
    Ham, you're a baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaad dude!!

  6. It accurately planes a surface at a set tangential angle to the face of the board to assist in creating a clean gluing surface. This is done to make a scarf joint and that's done to make angled headstocks which is something I've been loathe to do until now.

    or something to that effect.
  7. Rodent

    Rodent Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 20, 2004
    Upper Left Corner (Seattle)
    Player-Builder-Founder: Regenerate Guitar Works
    actually it's a device to impress the guys and does nothing more than make a load of noise, generate a ton of sawdust, and make long angled boards slightly shorter


  8. Could you plane angles in the perpendicular direction as well? I'm wondering how easy it would be to modify it to cut compound angles.

    Looks great Hambone!
  9. tribal3140

    tribal3140 Banned

    Nov 9, 2004
    near detroit...uh
    Scarf-ace is geniuos absolutely genious!
    golf claps everyone!

    excellent work!
  10. Thanx Geoff. By adding a hinge at the narrow end and making the tail end adjustable, you could do as many angles as you wanted but you wouldn't need to go perpendicular. If we are talking about the same thing...

    Rod, speaking of noise :help: That hollow cavity under the tray makes for one honking loud resonating chamber when the planer is running. I'm going to drill a series of holes in the sides to let some of that out and see if I can quiet it down a little.
  11. bassmonkeee

    bassmonkeee Supporting Member

    Sep 13, 2000
    Decatur, GA
    Tangenital? That happened to me when I fell asleep at the nude beach. :eek:

    Okay, I'll shut up now. :bag:
  12. Now that is a hot tool! with a great name to match!

    It should work a lot better than the router based set ups some of us use mostly because you don't have to do a million passes to level the surface. Plus with the planer you get a surface without marks on the first go, with the router we have to remove the bit marks.

    Good job!
  13. :bassist:
    Necessity has done it's share of inventing but laziness holds the record.
  14. teej


    Aug 19, 2004
    Sheffield, AL 35660
    That movie was on... last night? It may have been Saturday night.