scarf joint jigs

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by vbasscustom, Dec 29, 2008.


  1. vbasscustom

    vbasscustom

    Sep 8, 2008
    i know scarf joints have been covered on thus forum, but never really anybodys jigs, and i need one, a table or bandsaw one would be really great, but i might have what you use if its not one of the two, os any help would be great, im doin a 13 degree angle if that matters to anyone
     
  2. scottyd

    scottyd Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2006
    Waco Tx
    Builder/owner Redeemer Basses
  3. leppikallio

    leppikallio

    Oct 3, 2008
    Another good way to make the scarf joint is with router which has been shown by Wilser at least. Ends of the pieces doesn't have to be angled to start.

    Here is my version of the jig:

    03122008080.jpg
     
  4. T2W

    T2W

    Feb 24, 2007
    Montreal, Canada.
    I dont understand why a lot of people seem to have trouble with this. Sure you can build all these jigs, but I think we all got enough jigs for routing. Nothing beats a nice sharp blade on a miter saw imo. I simply put a scrap of about 3 inches high parallel to the 'fence' (where you usually press your pieces against) and clamp it against the fence, so now there is no more 'lost space' where the blade goes through. Next up I use a big 8/4 piece of scrap once again (usually pine cuz I got tons of the stuff at the shop, im a woodworker by day) but I make sure the piece is flat and square and I push that up against the blade and the modified 'fence'. So with that, I can put my neck blank against the 8/4 scrap, and have the blank parallel to the blade. For added security I clamp the blank onto the 8/4 scrap, making sure the blade clears it... and with one hand I cut it. The downside to it is you must cut the blank beforehand and cut the angle out on each piece, so you must glue the blank 2 inches longer than usual. But in my mind its by far the easiest and quickest way to do a scarf joint. I then dry clamp both pieces together and lightly sand with a block. Thats it. If you're all confused but still interested to know how I do it, I can always post pics of it tomorrow.
     
  5. T2W

    T2W

    Feb 24, 2007
    Montreal, Canada.
    Ok maybe this helps...

    Picture-2.jpg
     
  6. Cheers! :cool: does the mitre saw leave a nice surface for gluing, of do you need to tidy up with a plane after?
     
  7. T2W

    T2W

    Feb 24, 2007
    Montreal, Canada.
    nice clean blade I said, its not bad, I dont plane, I just sand a little with 180 grit, doesnt mess it up..
     
  8. scottyd

    scottyd Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2006
    Waco Tx
    Builder/owner Redeemer Basses
    That's sweet but not every one has a miter saw. I've never really had a good reason to use one for the basses, so that's a great excuse to go out and get one!:p I'm actually saving for a compound slider, I'd like to use it to slot with too. if I tell the wife I plan on putting up some new crown moulding I might be able to get it faster.;):bassist:
     
  9. Rickett Customs

    Rickett Customs

    Jul 30, 2007
    Southern Maryland
    Luthier: Rickett Customs...........www.rickettcustomguitars.com
    Scotty,
    The sliding compound miter is awesome, I picked one up last week.
    Craftsman sells some decent ones (I got mine for 230), I bought the 10", didn't know what I was missing for sure, hell, It even has a laser guide on it too.
     
  10. ewimsatt

    ewimsatt

    Jul 1, 2008
    Nashville, TN
    Pickup Maker, Luthier, and Repairman, Wimsatt Instruments
    I don't use a jig to cut the scarf. I draw my 12 degree line in the blank, bandsaw free hand, then run the cutoff piece on a squared up jointer taking off 1/64" per stroke. The whole operation from starting with a squared blank, cutting the scarf, jointing the back piece, and gluing takes no more than 10 minutes.

    Maybe some people can't afford a jointer? I can imagine building without a jointer and planer. Seems like it would be a nightmare of inaccuracies.
     
  11. Thats how acoustic instruments were made for centuries :)

    Im finding it hard going, but Im really enjoying using mostly hand tools. I made my first scarf joint using a router jig but the next scarf joint I do will be with handsaw and block plane :hyper: Im guessing I'll actually get better accuracy with this technique!
     
  12. A jointer plane, or even a regular hand plane will do the same thing-just take longer.

    Personally, I'm with Scotty-I like the bandsaw jig in the youtube video.
     
  13. T2W

    T2W

    Feb 24, 2007
    Montreal, Canada.
    That is a simple jig that seems to work very well (youtube), Id probably use it too cuz it seems even easier than my method, but I dont have a bandsaw. haha just like not everyone has a miter saw. anyways here is a pic of how I do it, for those who have a miter saw ! :D hehehe.

    Picture005-2.jpg

    Picture006.jpg
     
  14. Yeah, but if you built it backwards, (the youtube one) you could use it on your tablesaw.

    btw, did anyone notice that on the YT video he glued the scarf to the bottom?
     
  15. Nelson Guitars

    Nelson Guitars

    Aug 14, 2006
    Novato California
    Custom builder
    Here is the jig I use on my table saw. Just make sure your blade and the jig are absolutely square to the table.

    In this instance I am cutting the angle on a single piece neck for a steel string acoustic, but you can infer what would happen if I was trying to cut a scarf.

    BOheadangle.jpg

    I have learned to rough cut the angle first on my band saw and then just use this jig to shave and clean up the cut. The off cut has a tendency to want to wedge itself against the blade once it is released. I would think the same thing would happen to the neck in the miter saw shots in T2W's post. Is this a problem for you and how do you deal with it?

    Greg N
     
  16. JoelEoM

    JoelEoM

    Mar 11, 2002
    Lancaster, PA

    i did, and after asking why people do it like that, it makes more sense since it was explained to me to glue it to the top, so the fretboard helps clamp it.

    as a side note, i'm loving this forum for the willingness of everyone here to share their craft, without the sarcastic attitude that you find a lot of other places.
     
  17. scottyd

    scottyd Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2006
    Waco Tx
    Builder/owner Redeemer Basses

    Not bad, I love how you drew the diagram on it to show the clamp placement. I do that a lot, I also have neck dimensions wrote all over my shop walls.;)
     
  18. Nelson Guitars

    Nelson Guitars

    Aug 14, 2006
    Novato California
    Custom builder
    Simple things for simple minds!:smug:

    Greg N
     
  19. Stone Age

    Stone Age

    Apr 13, 2008
    Connecticut
    I just use a regular tapering jig on a table saw.
     
  20. I went ahead and built the jig from the YT video. Couldnt get it to work with my bandsaw-the blade deflected too much-but it worked great with my tablesaw with no modifications.

    CuttingScarf.jpg

    CuttingScarf2.jpg

    ScarfJoint.jpg

    Scarf2.jpg
     

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