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Scratched plastic coating.

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by shameandspite, Nov 10, 2005.


  1. shameandspite

    shameandspite

    Oct 12, 2005
    I have a fender p-bass that has a couple of deep gashes, past the plastic-ish finish actually into the wood. Were talking the cheap insrument finish here, and the gashes are about 1/16" deep at most, some are just scratches. Short of having it sent back to the factory, are there any products made specifically for this problem.
     
  2. dwm612

    dwm612 Guest

    Nov 2, 2005
    Olney, Maryland
    First off, let me ask this. Where are the scratches? If they're located on the backside of the bass that's to be somewhat expected - belt buckles... I wouldn't really worry about anything on the backside, there's really no stopping it. If they're on the front side of the body you could probably swing by a hobby shop and pick up some wood paint (no guarentees it'll be the exact same color as original finish due to fading or special blends) and wood putty.

    Before starting your repair make sure all strings, bridges, pick-ups, or knobs are out of way or protected! Wipe down area of repair with a guitar cleaner and NEW guitar wipe!!

    1. Fill the scratches with the wood putty and let harden.
    2. Once dry, sand putty smooth to the rest of the body, CAREFUL!! sand gently and caustiously, don't be an idiot and creat more scratchs...
    3. Wipe bass down to remove any dust and make sure bass is completely dry.
    4. Apply first coat of touch up, often this coat will be very light, almost see through. Make sure you apply paint very thin so final coats are not elivated above rest of body. Once first coat drys, wipe down area and apply second coat. Repeat 2 or 3 more times depending on how thick your coats are.
    5. Use a clear finger nail polish or a paint clear coat as the last coat and that should give you a shiny finish assuming that's what you're original body has.

    Once you're all done it should look ALMOST good as new, assuming you found an exact or very similar paint color. My other suggestion is to just keep the scratches, shows character and can tell a cool story (show damage) unless you weren't being careful and ran into something :rolleyes: I cringe every time I see a guitar/bass touch something other than a stomach, fingers, guitar stand, or case...

    Let me know how it goes if you give my advice a shot
     
  3. shameandspite

    shameandspite

    Oct 12, 2005
    Good advice, I thought about, though maybe not in that much detail. I'm hesitant to sand gloss plastic finish, I dont think I could get it to look factory ever again. Unless there was like a fiberglass fill made specifically for it I think I'll just paint and coat.

    BTW: They're on the side, normally Im like a mother with her cubs, but this stupid chair for some reason has a jagged broken metal rail on the side. Maybe cause I broke it and haven't got to filing it down yet. I have about four scratches equivalent in depth and three inches deep on the under side of my arm. No fill for those either.

    If I can get my roomates camera I'll post a picture. Somewhat ugly but kinda cool.
     
  4. dwm612

    dwm612 Guest

    Nov 2, 2005
    Olney, Maryland
    No matter how good you are there's someone out there who will be able to tell the guitar has been "repaired". Same principle as touch up a ding or scratch on a car. Do whatever you're most comfortable with. Best of luck and it's quite alright, I don't need to see your flesh wounds haha

    Let me know how it turns out
     
  5. shameandspite

    shameandspite

    Oct 12, 2005
    I meant pictures of the bass, but if you insist. :D
     
  6. dwm612

    dwm612 Guest

    Nov 2, 2005
    Olney, Maryland
    Oh! Bass pics would be cool, before and after the bassoptomy!!
     
  7. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    All furniture repair shops have (or should have) a method of repair using laquer sticks applied with a hot knife. The materials and tools are available from Stew-Mac but a one off repair is much more cost effective if you just let a furniture repair shop do it. I wouldn't expect to pay more than ten to twenty bucks for the repair.
    Repairs made with this method are inexpensive and will result in a very near invisible repair.
     
  8. dwm612

    dwm612 Guest

    Nov 2, 2005
    Olney, Maryland
    Now that's a good bit of advice I'll keep in mind... I would have never guessed I could take my bass to a furniture repair shop for visual surgery. There you have it shameandspite this could be cheaper than my method, all depends on if you wanna learn to DIY for future knowledge or pay to have a near perfect job!
     
  9. shameandspite

    shameandspite

    Oct 12, 2005
    I'm a do-it-yourselfer, but I'll think I'll let the furniture shop do it for me. Now to find out if they have a shop in my town of a barber, a cafe and me. I'll figure it out, and if I get it done I'll post pics.