"Short fingers" and "small hands" guys...your fingers are JUST FINE!

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by el_Bajo_Verde, Mar 11, 2018.


  1. Just stop! I'm getting so tired of hearing this!

    d7e638fe005c324bff1fba928b9bc54a.gif

    Unless you have the hands of a newborn baby, your hands are JUST FINE and you can play any bass you want! 4/5/6/7 strings, 30, 34, 35, 36 scale! Stop making excuses and practice! :roflmao::bassist:

    If you do have the hands of a newborn baby, I am sorry I offended you...Kala makes great Ukulele basses.
     
  2. Whatever you say! Physical limitations can be overcome by practice! That's good to know! What do you recommend to increase the length of fingers?
     
    el_Bajo_Verde likes this.
  3. It's not a physical limitation, though...just an easy out
     
    IamGroot likes this.
  4. Jazz Ad

    Jazz Ad Mi la ré sol

    Work on what you can change rather than lament on what you can't.
    Thou shall then live a longer, happier life.
    Increasing finger span through practice is a thing. So is learning to slide fingers to reach notes.
    Or do you need motivator pictures from guys who play bass with one finger, non finger, feet, a single arm etc?
     
  5. To be fair I've never once complained about small hands. I get frustrated by my pinky's inability to reach for some chords, but then look for alternate voicings or, as OP says, practice. I just think it's silly to complain about people who complain about a legitamate issue
     
    Door County Bass likes this.
  6. Nashrakh

    Nashrakh

    Aug 16, 2008
    Hamburg, Germany
    Just look at Malmsteen... he may be a guitarist, but MAN does he have sausage fingers. Ain't hurtin' him nothin'.

    Now that makes short fingers sound like a disability, which is unfair to people with real disabilities.
     
    el_Bajo_Verde likes this.
  7. lz4005

    lz4005

    Oct 22, 2013
    This is true.
    I used to date a girl who's sister was a 5'2" classical upright player. Her hands looked like they could belong to a 10 year old. But she was a great player.
     
    el_Bajo_Verde likes this.
  8. EricssonB

    EricssonB Supporting Member

    Apr 5, 2011
    CO
    Victor_Wooten_2.jpg
     
    two fingers, el_Bajo_Verde and JimK like this.
  9. socialleper

    socialleper Bringer of doom and top shelf beer Supporting Member

    May 31, 2009
    Canyon Country, CA
    That's because he is old and fat now. He wasn't always like that.
     
  10. socialleper

    socialleper Bringer of doom and top shelf beer Supporting Member

    May 31, 2009
    Canyon Country, CA
    To use an analogy, you can bring up Muggsy Bogues as an illustration of a short guy playing in the NBA, but for every under 6ft NBA player you can mention, someone else can mention 12 over 6ft. I wish Muggsy luck dunking on Shaq.
    Are longer fingers required to play bass? Certainly not. Is it advantageous? I think it is pretty clear that it is.
    Victor Wooten is the Bogues in this situation. His right hand technique is really where a lot of his skill is, and it generally sticks to 4 string basses, all though I know he occasionally plays a 5. He has found a way to make that work for him. However, statically speaking, the fastest bass players using 5 and 6 string basses in extremely technical music have pretty good sized mits. Working the top frets on the B of a five can cause cramping in my left hand. 6s are nearly impossible for me to play on the lower register with any sort of speed.
    The music I like is an extreme example. In many genres speed on a 6 string bass isn't critical. You could Django Reinhardt both hands on many classic bass lines. It is a matter of what you are playing.
     
    blue4 and project_c like this.
  11. bobba66

    bobba66

    May 18, 2006
    Arlington, Texas
    That baby has huge hands!:woot:
     
    el_Bajo_Verde likes this.
  12. Mvilmany

    Mvilmany

    Mar 13, 2013
    Upstate NY
    Play what is comfortable for you.
     
    el_Bajo_Verde likes this.
  13. I think that NBA to bass comparison is way too extreme. A player with smaller hands is more like a 6'1" point guard in this case. There are plenty of them and they do just fine! :D
     
  14. blue4

    blue4

    Feb 3, 2013
    St. Louis area
    People play the bass they like. With modern basses there's no reason why they shouldn't. SS, fanned fret, 15 strings, who cares. They all sound good. Frankly, I'm getting tired of people listing dumb reasons why they shouldn't. "I saw a 4'4 woman playing an upright. If she could so can you!" "Why not spend 100 extra hours practicing to play on a "34" instead of playing that perfectly fine Mustang?" "Just play what you like, but of course if you play that bass I'm going to assume that you don't practice, have bad technique, and like to make excuses." And so on.

    If someone wants to try a different bass to suit their needs, why get pissy about it?
     
  15. Frank Tuesday

    Frank Tuesday

    Jul 11, 2008
    Austin, TX
    I feel most comfortable playing a short scale 4 string with narrow spacing. Does it look silly on my broad, 6'3 (1.9m) frame? I don't care.
     
    blue4 likes this.
  16. guy n. cognito

    guy n. cognito Secret Agent Member

    Dec 28, 2005
    Nashville, TN
    Play what you want. Don’t concern yourself with the musings of a random on TB. ;)
     
  17. Please....I've got pretty small hands and I rock a 6 string fretless 34 Inch scale. Btw we play technical death metal crazy type stuff at 220 plus bpm all over the fretboard and super low stuff. Don't buy Into the hand crap some are trying to sell you. There are ways to make your physiology work for you not the other way around.
     
  18. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    What length are short fingers? I heard the same lame ash drivel for guitarists as well.
     
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