Short scale BEAD strings tuned in EADG

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Finnigan's wake, Sep 24, 2017.


  1. Quite simple:
    i wish to strung a shorty with the first 4 strings taken from a a 5 string set, then tuning in EADG to reach a higher tension.
    I'll broke my neck?
     
  2. You probably won’t break the neck, but it will end up bowing quite a bit, so will require some frequent truss rod adjustments, till it stabilizes.

    You are more likely to break the strings, especially the smaller ones.
     
  3. SLaPiNFuNK

    SLaPiNFuNK Inactive Commercial User

    Jul 28, 2006
    LA California
    The Brains: FretNation.com
    It works but very high tension if you use 65-125... I would not do more than 60-120 if that is what you are going to leave your bass in all the time.
     
    Finnigan's wake likes this.
  4. and you have something good in stock? I like half-rounds
     
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  5. SLaPiNFuNK

    SLaPiNFuNK Inactive Commercial User

    Jul 28, 2006
    LA California
    The Brains: FretNation.com
    There are no half round strings larger than 108... The ghs half rounds are as large as it gets for short scale.

    It would need to be NPS or SS rounds
     
    Finnigan's wake likes this.
  6. once assembled Starbass i'll contact you ;-)
     
  7. SLaPiNFuNK

    SLaPiNFuNK Inactive Commercial User

    Jul 28, 2006
    LA California
    The Brains: FretNation.com
    Try to make the distance from ball end to tuning post to the thickest string at least 37"... Then you can use long scale strings...
     
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  8. Nev375

    Nev375

    Nov 2, 2010
    Missouri
    Are you wanting to warp your neck? Because this is how you warp a neck.
     
  9. 2groggy

    2groggy

    Jan 17, 2015
    Toronto, Canada
    By "first four strings", I presume that you mean use the B, E, A, and D, and throw away the G. I have done this on my travel bass. It works. On a 34" scale B string, the E is at the 5th fret. IIRC, the 5th fret on a normal scale bass is about 25" from the bridge. So the tension on a B string at 34" is the same as the tension of the same gauge string on a 25 inch scale tuned 5 semitones up to E.

    The real difficulty is that you lose the tapered ends for the tuning peg holes. I used straight pull tuners on the travel bass so it didn't matter in my case.

     
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  10. If it is a neckthrough bass I wouldn't do it, that much tension can't be healthy for the neck.
     
    Nev375 likes this.
  11. oh no: bolt-on necks
     
  12. 2groggy

    2groggy

    Jan 17, 2015
    Toronto, Canada
    @OP, can you clarify what scale length you have in mind and what gauge strings will be used for each string?

    I see two different perceptions of your original post. Most are thinking that you will over tension the neck. Others think that the heavier strings will still be too floppy at a shorter scale. Without a clarification, we are all guessing. What's your plan?
     
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  13. My plan is reach a "standard" tension on my 30" bass(es). I'm in love with my shorties but in some cases the tension is too low and i cannot lower the action as i wish... anyway a low tension is better than a bowed neck!
     
  14. HaphAsSard

    HaphAsSard

    Dec 1, 2013
    Italia
    As noted above, short-scale half-rounds don't come thicker than .108 (GHS Brite Flats, short-scale set 3070).
    As for other types, my reply to you in another thread is reproduced below:
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2017
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  15. lz4005

    lz4005

    Oct 22, 2013
    Let's talk some reality here.
    You can get the same tension on a 30 and 34" bass by going up about .010 in gauge on your strings.
    Using BEAD strings would be overkill for what you want to do, in that it would be a .020 or .025 increase.
     
  16. Something I would like to point out for the OP regarding the GHS Brite Flats Short Scale set...

    First, their tension numbers are somewhat higher than a typical short scale set of rounds.

    G 049 - 42.9 lbs.
    D 062 - 36.4
    A 084 - 35.4
    E 108 - 35.5

    Total 149.7 lbs.

    Secondly, they have a reputation for being stiffer than average, which is a good thing when you want something that doesn't go all floppy on a short scale.
     
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  17. HaphAsSard

    HaphAsSard

    Dec 1, 2013
    Italia
    That's string-dependent of course (a fixed .005" increment being different, in percentage, when added to a thick, low-pitched string, e.g. a .105" E, vs. a thin, high-tuned one, f. ex. a .045" G), but true for E strings.
    For B strings, +/- .01" of string gauge = a little over -/+ 2" of scale length: in other words it takes a .015"~.02" increase in gauge for a low B string for it to have about the same tension at 30" scale as a given, less thick string at 34".
    For G strings, on the other end, it only takes .005" to make up for a 4" difference in scale.
     
  18. lz4005

    lz4005

    Oct 22, 2013
    Yes. You're right.
    I was thinking E strings.
     
    HaphAsSard likes this.
  19. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

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