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Sight Reading

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by bassduder, May 23, 2002.


  1. bassduder

    bassduder

    Jul 30, 2001
    Canada, GF-W
    I don't know if i'm in trouble or not, but i'm only in grade 11 now, and after taking a year off when I finish school, I plan on going to university, where i'm going to major in bass and then come home and get a degree in music and teaching...well here's the problem, I only started reading awhile ago, and I'm pretty sure I need to atleast sight read pretty damn good, just to do my major...So what i'm asking is, can you people at TB give me some tips or examples or songs or anything to help me get moving...

    PS - any of you older folks ever been in my situation?

    PSS - I'm also looking to sight read Treble Clef...

    :confused:
     
  2. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    Try reading everything you can get your hands on.
    Say the names of the notes as you are reading them, first slowly, then try to increase your reading speed.
    Try the same thing but play the notes on your bass instead.

    Practice transcribing songs or solos, this will also come in handy in your studies later.
     
  3. lazybassass

    lazybassass

    Jan 23, 2002
    Mass
    yep thats how i learned(still learning). overrall it just takes practice.
     
  4. SlapDaddy

    SlapDaddy

    Mar 28, 2000
    Get some tuba music...:p
     
  5. my .02 cents.

    The answer is already here in 3 posts.
     
  6. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Spend time every day doing it. It could just be 15 minutes, but if you it daily, by the time you're ready for school, you'll be improved dramatically.
     
  7. ...and the hymnbook is written in 4 parts. The bass line is usually pretty simple, and the melody is usually in treble clef. I find that as I practice the songs, my reading improves.
     
  8. stephanie

    stephanie

    Nov 14, 2000
    Scranton, PA
    Well said. If you plan on being a bass teacher I believe it's very important to be able to sight-read. As said above, read everything. Find books that help you. (I recommend Mel Bay's "Note Reading Studies For Bass" by Arnold Evans.) Also, try some Bach Cello Suites. Learn all your notes on the fretboard. Notes higher up can get tricky when trying to read them on a sheet of music.

    Read read read. Practice practice practice. :)
     
  9. James S

    James S

    Apr 17, 2002
    New Hampshire
    bassduder,

    It would not be advisable to study at a university in the United States if one could not speak the English language. Sufice is to say that you would not benifit wholly if you were to attend a music shool and could not read the musical language.

    To just "read everything you can get your hands on" will not normally produce good results. It is important to practice reading with a specific plan and goal.

    Try this one:

    http://www.jimstinnett.com/books.html#anchorbassclef

    BTW the term "sight reading" can be quite misleading. All reading music is by sight. And, it is somewhat impossible to read something you have never before seen. Just as it would be impossible for me to read the Japanese language unless I first studied it in depth.

    "Sight reading" in music is simply interpreting symbols you have previously learned by studying.
     
  10. Learn to play the piano... Seriously, then sightreading on bass will be easy. (twice the sightreading-not easy)
     
  11. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    I 2nd Bach's cello suites

    www.libster.com has a bunch of transcriptions you can use.

    Standing In The Shadows Of Motown has many a good transcription it it varying from basic to advanced

    Like Jazzbo said, read a little bit everyday, and it will eventually get easier
     
  12. Ibanezfreak

    Ibanezfreak

    May 26, 2002
    Sight reading is like anything else with music, ifyou doit enough it becomes second nature to you. I would go to the school music director, and ask him for some sugessted reading...If your goal is to become a music teacher then what better person to get advice from than someone who has already been there and done that...:cool: