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Sister Sadie on DB

Discussion in 'Music [DB]' started by greitzer, Feb 18, 2005.


  1. In the jazz band I play with on Thursday nights (big band), we just got a new chart of Sister Sadie, as recorded by an outfit called the GRP Big Band. It's pretty burning fast. Has anyone played this version on a DB? We're playing it at about 192 or 200 speed. The main lick at the beginning and end of the song is a bass-and-alto sax duet, with a series of 16-note runs. My right-hand fingers can't pluck the strings that fast. Does anybody know if the recorded version was actually played on a DB, or an electric bass guitar? And any tips (besides keep practicing?) I'd be curious to know. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jazzbass72

    jazzbass72

    Jun 26, 2003
    New York, NY
    Hi John,
    the original GRP big band recording of Sister Sadie was played on double bass by John Patitucci....I remember when that CD was released in 1992. If I am not mistaken, he takes a short burning solo as well on that one tune....that solo alone makes the CD worth buying. Unfortunately, my copy is back home in Italy. Maybe you can look it up on half.com or ebay. I am pretty sure you can find a used copy of it on those sites for $4 or something.

    As far as taking it up to speed, just practice it slowly at first and work the tempo up gradually with your metronome. If it still proves challenging, make sure you alternate your index and middle finger (on your plucking hand) and play your upright like you'd play an electric bass for those fast passages (fingers perpendicular to the strings, and not sideways). That's exactly how Patitucci got the job done then. Good luck!

    Marco
     
  3. Marco, thanks for the info and the advice. I'll try it with my fingers positioned as you suggested (perpendicular) and see how it goes.

    John
     
  4. jazzbass72

    jazzbass72

    Jun 26, 2003
    New York, NY
    You're welcome John. If you're into the iTunes/iPod thing, you can download that one track for 99 cents there. Believe me, it's worth it!

    Marco
     
  5. oliebrice

    oliebrice

    Apr 7, 2003
    London, UK
    a nice exercise for improving right hand pizz speed and tone:

    play the following open strings in this order (if it was D and G, kit works on all strings)
    DGDDGDGGDGDDGDGG etc... always alternating fingers on your right hand.
    play this with a metronome, gradually buold up yr speed and do it for 10 mins every day, you should find you get much moire control over yr right hand fingers. My teacher got this from Dave Holland, apparently.

    also, you could try setting a metronome, fairly slowly at first, and play first on every tick, then 2 to every tick, then triplets between every tick, if its slow enough build up to 4 every tick, or 2 triplets etc...
     
  6. That's a good exercise, I will try it. I appreciate it because I've found it very difficult to find anything on exercises or techniques for the plucking hand in jazz pizz. Lots of bowing exercises, but so few for pizz.
     
  7. oliebrice

    oliebrice

    Apr 7, 2003
    London, UK
    I forgot to emntion, when playing the DGDDGDGG excersies, and well as fingering it (right hand) 121212, try the slightly harder 212121. It is different, because you change strings on yr 2nd finger which until you get used to it requires more concentration, especially at speed.
     
  8. Interesting you shoudl bring this up. When trying the exercise, I've actually been doing it 212121 because it's easier for me than the other way. However, I'll work on it the other way as well. Thanks again for the advice, it's a great exercise.

    I'm doing the exercises with fingers perpendicular, as suggested earlier.
     
  9. jazzbass72

    jazzbass72

    Jun 26, 2003
    New York, NY
    One of my former Berklee teachers (Dave Santoro) used to study with Dave Holland as well, and made me hip to the same exercises that Oliebrice suggested. Those exercises seem to be pizzicato adaptations of several bowing technique exercises developed by classical bassist Fred Zimmermann. There's a whole book on them that Zimmerman wrote, called "A contemporary concept of bowing technique for the Double Bass". The book is still available on Universal Music Publishing, and I found it really helpful.

    Marco