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sitar/tanpura

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by olps, Dec 17, 2002.


  1. olps

    olps

    Nov 12, 2001
    Canada
    Anyone have any info on how the sitar and tanpura are played? I beleive one is drone instrument, and ones fretted while the other isn't? Any info is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. I.'.I.'.Nakoa

    I.'.I.'.Nakoa Guest

    Aug 10, 2000
    Fort Worth.
    The sitar is the fretted one, and it is played by sitting down on the floor ( as pictured) and plucking the string with mizrabs( finger pick ) I usually just use a guitar pick, it has more control. Mine has 7 playing strings and 11 sympathetic strings( I think thats right ) and those vibrate freely (when tuned right) as you play the main strings. Anything else you wanna know?


    [​IMG]

    -Nakoa
     
  3. odie

    odie Supporting Member

    Musical related and will fit in well over at Misc.
     
  4. olps

    olps

    Nov 12, 2001
    Canada
    Wow, thanks. I'm clear on the sitar; but whats a tanpura exactly? How is it played in comparison to the sitar? What is it's musical range in compared to the sitar? Thanks alot.
     
  5. Do some searching on the internet for tanpuras and classical Indian music. I had links to some sites, but I'm nowhere near my own computer. The tanpura is lower, has 3 or 4 strings, and comes in either instrumental or vocal size (one is bigger so it can be louder). I think it mostly drones; I'm not sure how much stopping of notes is done (it has no frets, too).
     
  6. Monkey

    Monkey Supporting Member

    Mar 8, 2000
    Dayton, Ohio, USA
    I play sitar, and would love to have a tampura. The tampura is not really "played" in the normal sense of a stringed instrument. It is only made to supply the drone in Indian music, and is held upright in the lap. It is "picked" in a weird way; you kind of caress it in the middle of the neck with the picking hand so that it doesn't have a noticeable attack. It isn't played in rhythm, either. If you listen to classical Indian music, the tanpura can be heard at the beginning before the main instrument plays. Often a promising student will be asked to play the tanpura, and it is considered an honor to be asked.

    I would love to have one, but I can't justify spending a lot of money on a drone instrument.
     
  7. Monkey

    Monkey Supporting Member

    Mar 8, 2000
    Dayton, Ohio, USA
    Here is a picture of a woman playing an enormous tanpura.