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Ski jump rant

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Bodeeni, Feb 27, 2016.


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  1. Bodeeni

    Bodeeni Supporting Member

    Jan 13, 2010
    NYC
    Am I the only one? I have had at least 6 Fender style necks go south on me over the years. The most recent was yesterday. What was, a very nice 2012 Fender MIM maple P Special neck. When I bought it, used, last year, it was very stiff and needed almost no truss rod. I have played it quite a bit. It has been in the closet for most of the last month. Took it out in the morning, everything seemed normal. Played it a bit. Came back at night and the neck had changed dramatically. It just bent at the 13 the fret. Not a little, but a lot. Maybe 2 degrees. It raised the action from normal about 5/32 to 3/8 plus and the neck is dead straight on either side of the kink, front to back. I do live in NYC and the apartment environment does go through pretty severe humidity changes throughout the year. But is has been a fairly warm year, so not the worst. Today in the house it is about 35%.
    Is this just crappy wood, green? Am I doing something wrong?
    I did try heat on another similar beater neck to unbend a kink. It seemed to work, but I don't have a good bench to really brace the neck properly when applying the heat. So on that test it straightened the bend, but left the neck a little wavy.
    Maybe I have a curse. In the 90s, I had two carbon Modulus necks warp. I am the reason they added truss rods to their necks after that. Sorry, for those that are convinced carbon "will never warp". I was in a colder climate and I think the temp changes going to and from gigs did them in.
     
  2. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2002
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Oftentimes, it's the nature of the beast. Steinberger composite necks (sans truss rod) are vulnerable, as well. Heat is not the answer. Depending on the severity, some minor fret work (run-off) or re-plane / partial re-fret are in order.

    Getting the Facts about Ski Jumps

    Riis
     
  3. Bodeeni

    Bodeeni Supporting Member

    Jan 13, 2010
    NYC
    On this neck, I am just looking at the wood grain. It looks like there was a knot right at the joint. Not a big surprise it went south.
    IMG_2538.JPG

    What is the experience with doing a planing job? Do these bends just reflect the way the wood want's to settle and will a planing fret job last?
     
  4. Turnaround

    Turnaround Commercial User

    May 6, 2004
    Toronto Canada
    Independent Instrument Technician, and Contractor to Club Bass and Guitar - Toronto
    Bodeeni and GKon like this.
  5. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2002
    Virginia Beach, VA
    It's a common remedial approach and, as I understand it, the results are an improvement over & above a simple run-off and sustainable. It's also a bit more expensive. The kink usually occurs at the transition between the neck and heel as there is a radical change in the cross-section mass. I have one bass where I opted for the run-off as it was practical and relatively inexpensive. I also don't play much above the 12th fret. I still have the option of going back and doing the full monty including the re-plane / partial re-fret so no harm done.

    Riis
     
  6. Bodeeni

    Bodeeni Supporting Member

    Jan 13, 2010
    NYC
    Thanks I have read the facts thread. I guess the problem is obvious given the construction. It just sucks. Are quartersawn necks any better? I have only had this on my Fender style necks. My Musicmans seem to stay straight.
     
    JustForSport likes this.
  7. Others have addressed the ski jump.
    I'll address the humidity level in your house. 35% is too low for both you and your guitars.
    Humidify your house.

    I live in the frozen north and manage to keep my house, a large and rather inefficient old cape cod with full basement, at 50% all winter long. I do it with two console humidifiers. They automatically maintain the level of humidity that I select.
    I have a lot of guitars and a couple of basses. Always out in the open on racks ready to play. No issues.

    My problem is excess humidity in the summer. Humidifiers not required then.
     
  8. GIBrat51

    GIBrat51 Innocent as the day is long Supporting Member

    Mar 5, 2013
    Lost Wages, Nevada
    After reading all this, and Turnaround's most excellent referenced thread - I'm definitely keeping my aluminum (alloy ;)) necked Kramers...:rolleyes:
     
  9. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    i've seen my share of aluminum kramers with bowed necks too :(

    i'll never own an instrument without an adjustable truss rod.
     
    petrus61 likes this.
  10. GIBrat51

    GIBrat51 Innocent as the day is long Supporting Member

    Mar 5, 2013
    Lost Wages, Nevada
    Bowed, or just plain mechanically bent? I can't imagine the string tension it would take to bow a metal neck with a T- cross section like a Kramer - but I'm sure you've seen more of them than I...:)
     
  11. JustForSport

    JustForSport

    Nov 17, 2011
    I've got over a dozen different types of basses, 15-20+ yrs old, with 2 piece, 3, 5, and 7 lam necks (with quarter-sawn sections) and NONE have a ski-jump issue. Most have 24 frets, and NONE have a Fender-style truss rod. Can't see changing my ways on this...
     
  12. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    that's a good question; i don't know whether it happened over time or even if they left the factory with too much up-bow, but i'v seen more than my share of these where i was just wishing the neck could be straightened out.
     
  13. Bodeeni

    Bodeeni Supporting Member

    Jan 13, 2010
    NYC
    Does anyone know if reinforcement bars in the newer USA and Warmoth necks go forward enough to help eliminate this
     

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