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slap pickups

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by Strat11786, Apr 20, 2002.


  1. can anyone recomend a good passive p-bass pickup, for under 100 bucks, that is goos for funk and slapping? is the basslines quarter pound good for this? thanks
     
  2. FalsehoodBass

    FalsehoodBass

    Jul 22, 2001
    Denver, CO
    in general, p-basses don't get that slapping tone well.. my guess is that bartolini would work the best for you...
     
  3. Planet Boulder

    Planet Boulder Hey, this is a private residence...man Supporting Member

    Nov 10, 2001
    6,482 feet above sea level
    I once had impure thoughts. Oh, and I pluck my ear hair.
    No matter what, you will NOT get a good "true" slap tone out of passive p-bass pickups. Of course, this really is subjective since some people like that early 70s funk sound that some bassists used P-basses for.

    My recommendation, and I speak from experience, is NOT to replace your stock Fender P-Bass pickups, if that's what you have now.

    I first tried Basslines P-Bass (couldn't stand the tone - they were "muddy") and I now have Kent Armstrong, which sound good, but nothing compares to the originals on my '82 P-bass.
     
  4. thanks for the advice. however, I have a squire, so the pickups are not as good as a fender. if it was a fender, i probably wouldn't have to change them
     
  5. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    How about some Fender Pickups.

    That seems like the natrual answer.

    Peace
    Nick
     
  6. Planet Boulder

    Planet Boulder Hey, this is a private residence...man Supporting Member

    Nov 10, 2001
    6,482 feet above sea level
    I once had impure thoughts. Oh, and I pluck my ear hair.
    Strat: Unfortunately, you are at a disadvantage with a P-Bass when it comes to slapping unless you do some major modifications (beyond just replacing the pickups). Why?

    a) P-bass-style passive pickups just don't possess the famous crisp slap tone that you hear with all of the famous slappers nowadays. You'd probably need to add a preamp (on-board or off) and add another pickup (jazz or MM) closer to the bridge, which brings me to my next point....

    b) The positioning of P-bass pickups is such that they do not get that crisp, tight slap sound. Because they are positioned halfway between the bridge and the neck, they simply won't give you the type of tone you'd get with a pickup that is located closer to the bridge.

    For both points above, compare the P-Bass to a MM Stingray or any other bass with a similar pickup configuration (like a Tobias Growler, etc.).

    In the end, you're better off just getting another bass so you can have basses with distinct tone characteristics in each.
     
  7. What is the general opinion about the "perfect" slap pickup?

    Is it a MM or ??

    This probably should be in the BASSES section, but I'm curious about the perfect pickup for slap.
     
  8. Planet Boulder

    Planet Boulder Hey, this is a private residence...man Supporting Member

    Nov 10, 2001
    6,482 feet above sea level
    I once had impure thoughts. Oh, and I pluck my ear hair.
    Depends on your definition of the "perfect" slap tone. Personally, I prefer the MM pickups, but a lot of people like the jazz pickups for their slap tone as well.

    "Perfect" can only be defined by what sounds good to your own ear, grasshopper!;)
     
  9. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    I keep hearing how the SD Quarter Pounder P-bass pickup has a "scooped" sound to it - many people have found it *not* to be what they want for pick-style punk and rock. But, maybe that's just the ticket for slap?
     
  10. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    Im not a slapper, so I dont have a very developed opinion on what a good slap tone is, but I remember when I went to the Berklee College of Music Basslines program, there were several players that prefered the P-bass for their sound, much of which was slapping. It is true that many also had a J- style pickup at the bridge position, but several did not.

    One thing that struck me was one of my teachers basses which was a P-bass with a J pickup, both of which were DiMarzio. It seemed to have a very good slap sound. It was very sharp and had a lot of punch and growl.

    So maybe P-basses arent such bad slap basses.

    Peace
    Nick
     
  11. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    A P and J setup, with both pickups on, doesn't sound much at all like just a P pickup. :)

    But there have been plenty of slappers on P bass - heck, it started (Larry Grahm) that way! :D
     
  12. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    Yeah I agree that a P and J dont sound like just a P, (I'm putting that setup in the bass im building.) But the point is, that the sound of a P isnt destructive to slap sounds.

    Also good point Larry Grahm and other early slappers (practically all early bassist Used P's) used P basses.

    Peace
    Nick
     
  13. My split-P has a very percussive attack (thump?) that my RB5 (jazz type) does not have. I'm not a slapper, but I do value that percussive effect from the P.

    Does the MM or other pickup have that big percussive impact of the P?

    A friend described a MM as a P on steroids... I'm curious, as I'm kinda GASsing for a MM SR5.