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Sleep disorder........

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Tim Cole, May 3, 2003.


  1. Tim Cole

    Tim Cole

    Jun 12, 2002
    Findlay, Ohio
    I saw another thread about a different kind of problems, and he got some valuable advice.....but I didn't want to hijack his thread, so here goes. This hasn't happened in a few weeks, and it had only been going on for about a weeks time. I would lie down to go to sleep, and I would be 90% asleep, and wake up with a big gasp for air....felt like I had been holding my breath for quite some time. I had obviously stopped breathing for some reason. This happened 3-4 times a night, for a few different nights. Every time I would just fall asleep, I would wake up very quickly with a big inhalation. It hasn't happened since though, so I haven't been too worried about it. Obviously, if this keeps occuring, I will have to go see a doctor, as I imagine oxygen starvation is a BAD thing :D Anyone else had problems like this? Is there an official disorder for this? I am also a chronic insomniac, as it is going on 4 am here, and I am still wide awake (as per usual). Thanks
     
  2. mikemulcahy

    mikemulcahy

    Jun 13, 2000
    The Abyss
    Just off the little info you gave me it sounds like Obstructive Sleep Apnea. First off, how old are you, weight etc. Have you been told that you snore alot.For the most part it isnt pathologic, but in the long run can cause some problems. You may just need to change your sleeping postition. But lets start with the basics. Give me a little more background asked for above.


    Mike
     
  3. Tim Cole

    Tim Cole

    Jun 12, 2002
    Findlay, Ohio
    Thanks for the reply! Like I said, this has only happened a few times, and it has been a week or two since.

    Well, I don't have many good answers for your questions though. I turn 29 this month, weigh about 245 at 6' (large framed guy though), and yes....I am a snorer I am told. I'm not planning to see a doctor yet, but if this continues, I will definitely do so. Thanks for your help.
     
  4. mikemulcahy

    mikemulcahy

    Jun 13, 2000
    The Abyss
    What you have told me are the basic symptoms of OSA. Some other things are definitely contributory factors are age and weight. What happens is the size of your stomach (not saying yours is big or small) restricts the excursion (movement) of your diaphragm, this disrupts the breathing pattern to the point that you stop breathing for a few seconds. Then the brain sends a message to take a deep breath due to the increase of CO2 in the blood stream.

    Another mechanism is the the tongue falls back into the hypopharynx (back of the throat) and obstructs airflow. By the same mechanism, you are awakened by the big snort of air.

    Most times these disruptions in sleep are not noticed by you, because you dont awaken completely, you are not concious of it. But in true OSA, it can happen hundreds of times in one night.

    My advice would be to keep an eye on your sleep habits, do you find yourself falling asleep in the daytime, when you wake do you fell just as tired as you were before you went to sleep. If these symptoms persist, see your doctor. You may need a polysmonogram (sleep study). This is a test i8n which your brain waves, heart, breathing and oxygen levels are monitored while you sleep. That will give a definitive diagnosis.

    Hope that helps and good luck.


    Mike
     
  5. Tim Cole

    Tim Cole

    Jun 12, 2002
    Findlay, Ohio
    That's every day. When I come home from work for the day, almost every single day I wake up grumpy and tired, after a few hours I find my "second wind", and am awake until anywhere from 2-5 am.

    Thanks for your help, it is very much appreciated....I will definitely pay close attention to it from now on.

    Tim
     
  6. That's every day. When I come home from work for the day, almost every single day I wake up grumpy and tired, after a few hours I find my "second wind", and am awake until anywhere from 2-5 am.

    Me too. My sleep pattern is screwed up.
     
  7. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    Thanks for the info mike.

    I used to freak my ex girlfriend out. I'd stop breathing while asleep, so she'd jab me in the back to see if I was still alive. I went to the doctor and I was then diagnosed as having mild sleep apnea. I was told to keep an eye on it and if it got worse, to do one of the sleep studies mentioned above.

    I think over time she got used to it and stopped panicing. So we gradually forgot about it......

    But I definitely still have it judging this question :-

    " do you find yourself falling asleep in the daytime, when you wake do you fell just as tired as you were before you went to sleep."

    Hell yes. And it's frustrating.

    Can anyone give any more information about these sleep studies? I'm starting to thing it's a good idea.
     
  8. mikemulcahy

    mikemulcahy

    Jun 13, 2000
    The Abyss
    Its called a Polysomnogram. Its a study in which brain waves, air flow, eye twitching, and abdominal motion are monitored while you sleep. Sometimes done at home or in a sleep lab. Sounds pretty iontense but its really a fairly simple procedure. The various wires and sensors are placed in such a way that you really dont notice them, and some person sits at a monitoring station and watches the info.

    While its quite common for breathing to stop during sleep (apneic period greater than 10 seconds i believe), some people have several hundred a night. The basic poop behind it is that you never really get adequate REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. The significance of that is that REM sleep is where the body and brain get the most rest (aka stage III and IV sleep). This explains why people with OSA (obstructive sleep apnea) wake up just as tired as they were before they went to sleep. This can also lead to a syndrome known as Pickwickien syndrome, usually seen in overweight people (look it up, i would rather not explain it, this reply is long enough, unless you request it then of course i will), and to some degree narcolepsy. There is a type of sleep apnea that generates from the brain, usually seen in stroke victims.

    Does that help? If not, ask me.


    Mike