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Small business ideas with $1,000 start up costs?

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by BusyFingers, Dec 20, 2016.


  1. BusyFingers

    BusyFingers

    Nov 26, 2016
    Anyone know of any kind of small business ideas that can get off the ground with $1,000 up front capital?

    The business doesn't have to generate a ton of money, but I need to clear approximately $1,000 profit each month.
     
  2. I got this book from the library it was something like 500+ businesses with as little as $250
     
    seang15 and GKon like this.
  3. BusyFingers

    BusyFingers

    Nov 26, 2016
    thanks for the tip
     
    GKon likes this.
  4. Grumry

    Grumry

    Jul 6, 2016
    Nashville
    Hot dog stand outside the most popular bar in town. You could easily clear 1k a week with drunk people looking for munchies.

    Offer the bar a percentage to rent a spot in their parking lot or something.
     
    GKon likes this.
  5. 48thStreetCustom

    48thStreetCustom

    Nov 30, 2005
    Colorado
    Esty
     
    GKon likes this.
  6. Jeez. You would need 10k to start a hotdog stand in NZ. Half for legal expenses getting council approval.
     
    Gazman likes this.
  7. BboogieXVII

    BboogieXVII

    Feb 4, 2013
    jammin
    Hmm, I did just see a guy last week with his weiner stand out the back side of a bar. I do wonder though if he had all the legal shlameal sealed away. Probably not as there is more to it than meets the eye, yeah he's probably making makin money but not so much if he gets turned in and caught.
     
  8. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Fort Worth, Texas
    That's really sad. In Texas in 1986 I started a business. It cost $7.00 for a DBA (doing business as) certificate.
    I was on my way home from getting fired because I refused to participate in a dishonest scheme my boss had in mind. Then I went home and got on the phone and started calling prospective clients. Within 2 years, I had 1800 sqft of office space, 5 full time employees, and 2 part time. We were doing about $500,000 a year in revenue.
    I was providing computer systems for small businesses, both hardware and software. We also did customized software and training. Two years after that, I had to fold it up. The economy in Houston had tanked from bank, oil, and real estate failures. Every programmer in town was now a consultant doing work for what it cost me to do the work.
    Maybe I should have started a hotdog stand.
     
    seang15, RoadRanger and Gazman like this.
  9. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Fort Worth, Texas
    There was a girl scout in Colorado who set up to sell cookies outside a pot shop and did a ton of business.
    Just and idea.
     
  10. INTP

    INTP

    Nov 28, 2003
    Dallas, TX
    1. Videotape yourself playing video games and jabbering at the screen.
    2. Post the videos on YouTube
    3. Profits.
     
  11. buldog5151bass

    buldog5151bass Kibble, milkbones, and P Basses. And redheads.

    Oct 22, 2003
    Connecticut
    You expect to start a business that will get you a grand profit per month with just a grand start up capital? Good luck.
     
  12. Gorn

    Gorn

    Dec 15, 2011
    Queens, NY
    Roadside haberdashery.
     
    shadowtippy likes this.
  13. DiabolusInMusic

    DiabolusInMusic Functionless Art is Merely Tolerated Vandalism Supporting Member

    This answer just keeps coming up in OT: drugs.
     
    catcauphonic, Immigrant and PWRL like this.
  14. Richland123

    Richland123

    Apr 17, 2009
    Shoeshine Stand

    54d41013bc883_-_esq-shoeshine-051414-sc02b9-xl2.
     
  15. saltydude

    saltydude

    Aug 15, 2011
    boston CANADA
    IMG_2036.JPG
     
  16. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Fort Worth, Texas
    How much for a double? :hyper:
     
  17. hbarcat

    hbarcat Supporting Member

    Aug 24, 2006
    Rochelle, Illinois
    In the early 90's I bought a basic 35mm camera outfit (Nikon camera with a couple of lenses, flash, tripod and accessories for about $800 and paid the $40 for my dba and $25 for 1,000 business cards and a pile of flyers.

    My business was called "ACTION PHOTOGRAPHY" and I specialized in photo shoots that other photographers didn't want to or couldn't deal with. Everything I did was on location (which means I didn't have to pay for a studio and I conducted business in the clients homes or workplaces). I cultivated people I knew in amateur sports and in equestrian events to make contacts with people who wanted portraits taken in action. I took pictures at hockey, baseball, football, soccer, rugby, track and field, cross country and other sporting events, but the most lucrative was equestrian events.

    The critical component of doing this type of photography is to have the experience to know how to do it well. Sports photography is very, very different from portraiture or wedding type work but I happened to have been a freelance photojournalist for about 4 years, much of that covering local sporting events and learned the necessary skills.

    I did this successfully, but only part time. I didn't make very much money because I kept my full time day job and only did the photography on weekends and the occasional evening. Truly, I could have made a lot of money doing the photography full time if I had jumped in with both feet but I just didn't feel comfortable abandoning the security of a steady paycheck with health insurance for me and my wife and infant child.

    This illustrates some of the difficulties of starting a small business. Having a new family that depends on you and not having a steady paycheck is extremely stressful. It also means that you're putting in 60 or more hours per week for at least a few years until you develop a client base of repeat and referral customers.

    And then you have to provide a product or service that you are good enough at doing that not every other goof on the street can do as well. Customers need to perceive the value in YOU and YOUR business specifically.

    The question you need to be asking is "What can I do that I'm good at that might be valuable to others?"
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2016
    Groove Doctor likes this.
  18. Exactly. I'm pretty sure the heroin trade is going to continue to boom.

    Just don't use. The profit margin disappears quick that way.
     
    DiabolusInMusic and catcauphonic like this.
  19. fhm555

    fhm555 So FOS my eyes are brown

    Feb 16, 2011
    we have an 82 YO neighbor lady who is nearly blind and lives alone who we take dinner to most evenings. He sister was visiting last week so we took enough for two. I don't recall which city the sister was from, but she said a meal service for the elderly in her home town would be a great thing to have available.
     
  20. knumbskull

    knumbskull

    Jul 28, 2007
    UK
    Broadly speaking, i suggest something that monetises your skills and experience and can be facilitated and promoted using your existing contacts and resources as a base while keeping overheads to a minimum with a plan for rapid expansion within the first quarter.

    Or drugs.
     
    LiquidMidnight likes this.

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