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So I freaked out trying to fix my bass...

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Danny McGinn, May 22, 2017.


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  1. Danny McGinn

    Danny McGinn

    Apr 25, 2017
    I just got a used g&l L2500. I noticed a couple of washers underneath the neck bolt screw heads had play in them. When i went to tighten them they were frozen in place. I finally got a couple loose enough to take out but forgot to fully detune my bass when doing so because I panicked. After, i took things apart the right way and blew out the drill holes for the neck with a can of compressed air and applied candle wax to the neck screws threads. Everything went together fine after. How much damage did I cause and why did this happen?
     
  2. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    If the action is good and it plays well with no visible damage, there's probably no damage at all. Those necks and bodies aren't made of glass, they're pretty tough wood.
     
    Garret Graves likes this.
  3. Danny McGinn

    Danny McGinn

    Apr 25, 2017
    It's a tribute L2500. I applied quite a bit of pressure tightening and loosening screws for them to work right
     
  4. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Halethorpe, MD
    As long as the screws are all holding and you haven't buggered the screw heads. you're fine. Apparently the previous owner loosened the screws for some reason and didn't get them tight again. Maybe the previous owner doesn't know the wax/soap trick to lubricating threads. If the heads are buggered up you might want to replace the screws while the lube is still effective and you can easily get the screws out.

    As an aside, I suspect the screws are also biting into the body. They shouldn't. The next time you have the neck off you should make sure the screws pass through the body unimpeded.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2017
    Garret Graves likes this.
  5. Danny McGinn

    Danny McGinn

    Apr 25, 2017
    I didn't understand the last part
     
  6. guy n. cognito

    guy n. cognito Secret Agent Member Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 28, 2005
    Nashville, TN
    It was completely out of context. I'd ignore it.

    Your bass is fine. Nothing to see here.
     
  7. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Halethorpe, MD
    The screws should attache the neck to the body in a clamping fashion. The screws shouldn't actually be screwed into the body, they should just pass through it; as if the body is a washer. That allows the neck to be pulled fully into the pocket during assembly. If the screws are threading into the body, it is possible to have a gap between the neck and the body should the neck not be fully seated.

    The reason I think the screws are screwed into the body is because the screws were so hard to get out; that indicates the full length of the screw was engaged. It's not drop dead important, but something to keep in mind the next time the neck is off.
     
    Garret Graves likes this.
  8. Danny McGinn

    Danny McGinn

    Apr 25, 2017
    I understand. I'm used to fenders with the four bolts and neckplate. I crammed on these screws to get them down and nothing. That's when I knew something wasn't right and it was work to get them out. Worst case, I'm not opposed to threaded inserts if it were to come down to it. I might just be over thinking it. There's nothing worse than a bad experience with something you haven't gotten a chance to experience yet
     
  9. Danny McGinn

    Danny McGinn

    Apr 25, 2017
    Everything's good and set up. My new problem is the brass but haS WAAYYYYY larger slots in it than standard gauge strings and its rattling like crazy on open notes