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So I thought I knew what "Series" rigging was...

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Soreinsun, Oct 22, 2010.


  1. Soreinsun

    Soreinsun

    Oct 22, 2010
    I assumed "Series" meant daisy chaining cabinets together. For instance on my carvins that would mean using a cable for "input" and then linking the "Output" to another cab. I recently read somewhere that this wasn't actually "Series" and in fact it was more complicated than that.

    Also... what does Series rigging to to resistance and power handling? Would two 8 ohm cabs become 16? or 4? Would the power handling of each be increased? or stay the same?

    As always... thanks.
     
  2. Jazz Ad

    Jazz Ad Mi la ré sol

    Check the very first post at the top of the amp forum.
     
  3. username1

    username1

    Dec 28, 2005
    alberta canada
    If you connected your cabs together like you mentioned it would be a parallel conection. If you connected 2 8ohm cabs like that you would get 4 ohms. No matter how you wire it, it wont change the power handling of the speakers, only the power output from your amp. Wireing speakers in series increases the load,2 8ohm in series would give you 16ohms.
     
  4. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
  5. Soreinsun

    Soreinsun

    Oct 22, 2010
    Thanks Gents!

    And post Jazz ad sent me to was helpful. The only thing I couldn't find was how series or parrellel effects power handling. My gut is telling me that power handling doesn't change, even though the two (or more) cabs are sharing the load. Do you guys have any thoughts on this?
     
  6. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    You wire the speakers to get an ohm load that's ok for the amp. You figure out the total/final ohms of all the cabinets you have hooked up and that's what the amp will see.

    For example, the amp will be working just as hard and putting out just as much power when powering one 4ohm cab as it is when powering two 8ohm cabs wired in parallel = 4ohms.

    There are FAQ's and sticky's and links all over this stuff. There's probably a conversion chart somewhere that provides all the different combinations and takes the math out of the equation too.

    To be more specific with my link try this.

    http://www.colomar.com/Shavano/spkr_wiring_sp.html


    "series" and "parallel" are wiring terms. They have nothing to do with cabs being physically standing in a series.

    Most if not nearly all speaker jacks on the back of amps and plug-in jacks on the back of speakers are wired in parallel. That means + to + and - to -. Parallel connection means the ohms get lower as you string more speakers along. 8+8=4, 4+4=2. A series connection makes the ohms go higher. 4+4=8, 8+8=16. This defeats the purpose of hooking up more cabs to get louder by roughly half because higher ohms means less power from the same amp.

    Wiring 2 speakers in series means you run a wire from the + side of the jack to the + on one speaker and a wire from the - side of the jack to the - of the other speaker, then run a wire connecting the remaining + and - of each speaker that's not connected to anything yet.

    This would be used if you had a pair of 4ohm speakers and needed an 8ohm cab, you'd wire the 2 speakers in series inside the cab so when you plugged the amp into it, it'd see an 8ohm cab......or if you wanted to run a pair of 4ohm cabs on an amp that was not stable at 2 ohms, you'd then hook up the cabinets in series to make the amp see an 8ohm load. You'd still get a volume increase by the added speakers but you wouldn't benefit from increased volume/headroom as the amp would be running at "8ohm" power. Doubling power gets you 3db, doubling speakers gets you at least 3 and arguably 6, at least in the lower end.


    This all applies to solidstate amps. Tube amps are a different animal. They either have a switch or different jacks to plug into depending on what the final ohm's are on whatever speakers(s) you're plugging into.

    I can't explain it any simpler than that and probably never will.:smug:
     
  7. Soreinsun

    Soreinsun

    Oct 22, 2010
    will33, that was... *sniff* beautiful *sniff* :D
     
  8. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Retired Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    To be clear, whether you run one 8-ohm speaker off each of two outputs of your amp or daisy chain the same two speakers, the result will be exactly the same: a 4-ohm load on your amp. You would have to know what you're doing and go to a lot of trouble to put two cabs in series. It won't happen by accident.

    If you did go to the trouble of making a special cable to wire them in series, the result would be a 16-ohm load on your amp, and the amp's power output would be cut significantly. This will not harm a solid state amp, but could damage a tube amp.
     
  9. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    Good points.
     
  10. baron665

    baron665

    Apr 9, 2010
    Michigan
    Is this what people who use one amp and 4 cabs do? Change a cab from 8 ohm parallel to 16 ohm series? Or would that increase the ohms even more?
     
  11. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Retired Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    It's not necessary. Let's say you have an Eden WT-800 in one of its later iterations (B or C). It has two power amps, each capable of putting out 550 watts into 2 ohms. So you could run two 4-ohm speaker cabs on each side to get maximum power out of 1,100 watts (550 watts per side). Or you could run two 8-ohm speaker cabs out of each side to get 440 watts per side (each side seeing a 4-ohm load). Either way, it's going to get pretty danged loud around there.
     

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