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So I tried Fender Elite jazz basses today...

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by bongostealth, Nov 30, 2017.


  1. Gianni "Orlandez" Orlati

    Gianni "Orlandez" Orlati Guest

    Sep 26, 2015
    I own both (P basses) and all I can say is that they serve slightly different purposes with a certain field of superposition ...
    The Am. Pro. are very well constructed and finished passive instruments ... you can choose to use the Elite in the same way as the Am. Pro. but you can also expand your tonal palette taking advantage of the second pickup and of the parametric onboard preamp thd Elite is supplied with ... price is justified under both cases IMO
     
  2. prokfrog

    prokfrog

    Mar 16, 2007
    new jersey
    What is it that you think they did to get more grit out of the Elite?
     
  3. Panther

    Panther

    Dec 9, 2004
    Nova Scotia
    I tried two with what I think are now 4th generation noiseless pickups...they still made noise. A lot of noise in active mode. Opted for a Sadowsky RV4 and dead silent with the buckers...passive or active. Yum.

    They didn't seem noisy at the store but it was at home. Nice tobacco burst or whatever they call it.
     
  4. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    It is said that sometimes shielding can reduce high end response, but I've never noticed it much, especially in a performance setting (studio mix or especially live). Sadowsky is HUGE into shielding (some of their single coil pickups are literally wrapped up like xmas presents under the covers). Other vendors are more puritan and do more conservative shielding... especially with hum reducing or canceling pickups. I feel Fender is in the middle on it. In general, I find my Elite does better than average, but not the best in my collection. As a general rule, it's fine unless the venue is particularly brutal. I always bring two axes to new venues just in case.
     
  5. UmamiBass

    UmamiBass

    Apr 14, 2014
    Columbus, OH
    You're totally correct, and I think imitation is flattery to a certain degree. Leo Fender really nailed the base "DNA" these instruments had. People like Mike Lull and Roger Sadowsky really tried to correct shortcomings of the originals, not only because of certain design aspects, but also because players were asking for something more from their instruments as time went on.

    Instruments, like many other things manufactured, are improved upon incrementally, and those increments can be due to certain needs or design "improvements". I try not to get into the hype too much about brands, and I play a Fender Custom Shop Jazz Bass now that is really similar to the deluxe/elites. I like the fingerboard radius better on mine though, and I've made plans to put Nordstrand electronics in mine over the stock electronics. I find Nordstrand's stuff to be more even, and have certain designs that fix some of the real world situations that I find myself in. I'm sure the Fender stuff is fine, but it's just not to my taste. I love the instrument though, and I found myself going back to Fender after trying Sadowsky basses in NYC, owning a Lull, and playing a Lakland for years. Some things just have mojo to them, but I think mojo is incredibly subjective.
     
  6. hands5

    hands5

    Jan 15, 2003
    good 'ol USA/Tampa fla.
    none
    Exactly
     
    Mr_O'B likes this.
  7. hands5

    hands5

    Jan 15, 2003
    good 'ol USA/Tampa fla.
    none
    Same here
     
  8. prokfrog

    prokfrog

    Mar 16, 2007
    new jersey
    What aspect of top load is it that makes you prefer it over thru-body? Just curious.
     
  9. hands5

    hands5

    Jan 15, 2003
    good 'ol USA/Tampa fla.
    none
    Fender voiced the pickups closer to almost a 70's type tone in the Elite were as the Deluxe is more of a modern sound but here's the thing, with the Elite you can get that Modern/Vintage tone.. at least I can in mine.
     
    prokfrog likes this.
  10. mesaplayer83

    mesaplayer83

    Jun 27, 2017
    Personally, I've had *a few* basses that offered both string thru and top loading, so I tried both with them to see if there was any appreciable differences...IMO/IME, there weren't any differences regarding tone or playability - BUT, stringing thru the body increases your chances of string twist and can narrow down string choices due to requiring a different winding length than top loading does...

    In short, no advantages with string thru, but a couple disadvantages - IMO/IME....
     
  11. RichSnyder

    RichSnyder Supporting Member

    Jun 19, 2003
    Columbia, Md
    Most string-through bridges are dual loading and can go both ways. So, you can use longer strings without having that thick part of a 35" string wrapped on to the E string or B string post. I've never had any string twisting with any strings on any bridge as long as you wrap it properly and not add twists to the string.
     
  12. king_biscuit

    king_biscuit Supporting Member

    May 21, 2006
    US

    I totally agree with this and it's the reason I don't like string through basses.
     
    Wood and Wire likes this.
  13. mesaplayer83

    mesaplayer83

    Jun 27, 2017
    I'll stick with what I posted - whatever works for you, though...
     
  14. Chucky Stiletti

    Chucky Stiletti Supporting Member

    Jun 8, 2017
    Santa Cruz, CA
    If you string it through the bridge, not the body, the metal fittings on the back for body through stringing fall off. Not cool on a bass this price...
     
  15. glocke1

    glocke1

    Apr 30, 2002
    PA
    this happened to you?
     
  16. Chucky Stiletti

    Chucky Stiletti Supporting Member

    Jun 8, 2017
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Yes, both on my Elite Jazz and my Deluxe Precision. I opted for through body stringing on both.
     
  17. UmamiBass

    UmamiBass

    Apr 14, 2014
    Columbus, OH

    I think this used to be more of an advantage when it came to older types of bridges. Most companies offer some version of a high mass bridge now. The reason of string through body many times, is to increase the downward pressure on the bridge saddle. This pressure usually was associated with stronger transfer of the string vibration to the instrument. It’s also a lot easier than producing locking style bridges. Even Fender just ripped off the Leo Quan type bridge. The high mass bride they made was just a beefed up version of the vintage versions. The new custom shop bridge is more expensive to produce but is somewhat locking in its design.
     
  18. Chucky Stiletti

    Chucky Stiletti Supporting Member

    Jun 8, 2017
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Great post. Totally agree. The pre58 P basses all had through body stringing.
     
  19. toowrongfoo

    toowrongfoo

    Nov 25, 2017
    Thank you. It's really frustrating when you tell the truth and people just question it.

    LSS, it's back at GC. Lesson learned. Luckily the Ibby I bought for 5 string duties is dead quiet and is a champ.
     
  20. sanwin17

    sanwin17 Please mommy, you just gotta buy this amplifier. Supporting Member

    Jan 23, 2010
    Highland Beach, FL
    Both my Elites are dead quiet in any mode.
     
    craig0316 likes this.

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