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so....will my bass ever be worth loads?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by anonymous278347457, Feb 16, 2006.


  1. anonymous278347457

    anonymous278347457 Guest

    Feb 12, 2005
    I was wondering, if i just kept my bass until I was about 40-50 or something will it be worth loads as a "vintage" instrument? or does vintage only apply to already high range basses?

    ive got a MIM jazz btw
     
  2. Well, ya never know.

    I wonder if my £100 Westfield will be worth much in 50-60 years?:p
     
  3. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    A Vintage Fender is really only from the Golden Age - i.e. pre CBS - when they were making basses on a much smaller scale, with higher quality standards and before it became a big factory operation.

    Value is down to supply and demand as well - so they didn't make so many basses - demand exceeds supply = high prices!

    But they have made huge numbers of MIM basses , so I doubt they will ever be rare enough to be valuable!
     
  4. No.
     
  5. Showdown

    Showdown Supporting Member

    Jan 21, 2002
    Honolulu, Hawaii

    You never know. There are basses from the '70s that were considered to be junk then, but are selling for pretty good money today. Then again, I have a late '60s Teisco guitar in good condition, and they go for less than $200. In other words, who knows?

    Some prices on Ebay right now:

    1978 Fender Musicmaster - a student guitar - $699
    1973 Fender Mustang - another student guitar - $1149
    1975 Fender Musicmaster $600

    These were all budget beginners instruments and are all going for a lot more than they cost new.

    As I said, who knows?
     
  6. It seems to be human nature to always believe things that are older are valued as more.

    one of the reasons old fenders, les pauls and such are worth so much isn't just rarity, its the supposed tone

    The theory on tone is that its achieved because the old nitro finishes were very gel like, and didn't fill the wood grain. Once the finished cracked, the wood was allowed to breath. The newer finishes fill the grain in because they are thinner. They won't get the same theorized tone boost from finish cracking. Oil finishes are supposed to skip all this and let the wood tone come naturally. Then its all about age....

    The other part is wood age. As wood ages it matures in a way. So older instruments can age very well and can produce better tone than young woods.

    All that is theory though.



    All that said, you just never know. A big trend right now is to make your fender look bad. Maybe it becomes so popular that 2005 model Jazz basses in wonderful condition will become rare. Maybe there's something in the finish that makes them sound like crap 30 years from now if they are not kept in perfect condition.
     
  7. Showdown

    Showdown Supporting Member

    Jan 21, 2002
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Look at what 70s Fenders are going for today - as vintage instruments (your definition doesn't fit the current market) - and they were widely considered to be poorly made instruments at the time.
     
  8. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Just because people are stupid enough to get suckered into paying large sums of money on eBay does not mean a bass is "Vintage"...:meh:
     
  9. Showdown

    Showdown Supporting Member

    Jan 21, 2002
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    He wanted to know if his MIM would get vintage prices in 40-50 years. If people are paying large sums of money for them that would qualify as far as his question is concerned.
     
  10. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    But the answer to that is clearly NO - as they have made so many of them! :meh:
     
  11. HMZ

    HMZ Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2003
    USA-Mineola
    No there a dime a dozen
     
  12. jomahu

    jomahu

    Dec 15, 2004
    Bos, MA
    hey, you never know - remember, we're living in a time where freakin' motley crue is vintage and cool!:p

    and not to hijack the thread, but what basses/models do y'all think will stand the test of time?
    let me know so i can buy my ibanez EDA right now! :D
     
  13. Showdown

    Showdown Supporting Member

    Jan 21, 2002
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    I don't thinkm it is that clear. A lot can happen in 40-50 years. For example, basses that 10 years ago were virtually worthless are now selling for decent money - largely because of Ebay. I don't think we can predict what the market will be like then. Maybe the basses of tomorrow will be so poorly made that MIM Fenders from today will look great by comparison. Ther are just to many variables to positively state that they won't be worth anything.

    I would agree that they probably won't be worth much, but it is not "clearly NO".
     
  14. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    But it clearly won't be a "Vintage" instrument in the way that I think of as the correct definition of "Vintage" - which has nothing to do with money!

    So from Dictionary.com

    "Characterized by excellence, maturity, and enduring appeal; classic. "


    Nothing to do with money !!
     
  15. Showdown

    Showdown Supporting Member

    Jan 21, 2002
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    By definition "vintage" can just mean old. A junky Japanese bass from the '60s is vintage.

    adj.
    1. Of or relating to a vintage.
    2. Characterized by excellence, maturity, and enduring appeal; classic.
    3. Old or outmoded.
     
  16. anonymous278347457

    anonymous278347457 Guest

    Feb 12, 2005
    thanks for the info guys.

    but i just realised, when im 50-60 I would have had my bass for so long that I wouldent want to sell it.
     
  17. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member


    But it's generally accepted that when people talk about "Vintage Basses" they mean # 2 !!

    Most people wouldn't even bother to argue about this!! :eyebrow: - everybody knows what is meant by the term in this context!
     
  18. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    When you run into people trying to sell crappy gear that's supposedly "vintage" just because it's old, it's obvious to me that the term doesn't have a strict definition in this context. Vintage freaks obviously mean #2, while salesmen might mean #3 as well - so some miscommunication could happen here. Though it shouldn't be anything that true vintage freaks wouldn't be able to see through... but people with too much money and too little knowledge might not.
     
  19. Showdown

    Showdown Supporting Member

    Jan 21, 2002
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Really? Go to Ebay sometime.
     
  20. You're right....so why are you?