Social Media: Posting Schedule

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by Jamvan, Mar 4, 2017.

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  1. Jamvan

    Jamvan The Bassist Formerly Known As Meh Gold Supporting Member

    Nov 11, 2014
    Minnesota
    For those of you out there using a virtual presence (eg. website, Facebook page, etc) to help promote your band, how much of your upcoming schedule do you reveal on your pages? We use Facebook events and usually create them as soon as they are scheduled regardless of how far in the future they may be. Other bands I follow only create or post about a gig a week or so in advance and don't reveal anything about their upcoming schedules until the time is near.

    I like to show that we're a busy band and try to turn that into further commitments from existing and new venues but I can see where keeping the schedule pretty tight makes it seem like this week's gig is the last time to catch a particular band creating the illusion of a limited availability. What's the preference or best practice as it relates to this? Does it matter?
     
  2. Bodeanly

    Bodeanly

    Mar 20, 2015
    Chicago
    If the gigs have a significant amount of traveling distance between them, I have no problem sharing multiple events. For example, if gig A is over an hour drive from gig B, promote simultaneously. If they are geographically close (or even at the same venue), I would vote to hold off promoting gig B until gig A has passed.
     
  3. PauFerro

    PauFerro

    Jun 8, 2008
    United States
    I put our full schedule on our website -- but that is for clients to see. It helps you sell the band when clients see you are busy.

    But on social media, you don't want to give your following too many options. They think "I can see them on any one of these three dates, so I'll sit home tonight". And then they don't go at all...at least, that's my theory.

    I agree, that if one gig is really far from another gig, then post them both to show momentum and stuff. It's unlikely most people will consider a gig in another city 50 miles away an option to see you. But as rule, I'd try to keep everyone engaged with posts about other stuff -- band member's wife had a baby, your new CD, asking the following for song suggestions. Post the gigs close enough to the time you play to create a kind of scarcity mentality in your following where they don't know how long it'll be before they get another chance, so they go to see you at your next gig.
     
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  4. garp

    garp

    Feb 7, 2009
    Connecticut USA
    I know of at least one band that uses Google Calendar to post their gigs, both publicly and for internal scheduling purposes. From my perspective, the number of blacked-out dates titled "Private Event" – whether real or completely contrived – helps to perpetuate "the illusion of limited availability." Just a thought.
     
  5. DirtDog

    DirtDog

    Jun 7, 2002
    The Deep North
    Full schedule on website. Post gig alerts on social media 3-5 days in advance. Don't bother with "events" posts. Sometimes we boost a gig alert post if it's a place we haven't played before or if it's been a long time since we played there. Social media has been only marginally useful for us getting bums in seats at the venue.

    99% of the time, this is the only promotion happening. Venues are notoriously crap at promoting around here...virtual or otherwise.
     
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  6. Jamvan

    Jamvan The Bassist Formerly Known As Meh Gold Supporting Member

    Nov 11, 2014
    Minnesota
    So generally, keep them off social media until the gig is closer at hand. We do use Google calendar as our management tool to track our schedules and such so we have a master list of dates readily available so maybe I'll pull some of the future gigs down from our Facebook page until we're closer to the actual dates. Good advice. Thank you!
     
  7. hrodbert696

    hrodbert696 Moderator Staff Member

    I agree with what most are saying - make the whole calendar available on a band page. Also, whenever we book a gig, we mention it in a facebook post. But don't create a gig alert or event invitation until a few days ahead; you have to ask, when does your target audience decide what they're going to do this weekend? I think for most people it's probably about Wednesday that they start thinking about what they're doing Friday, unless it's a bigger deal like a big sporting event or concert, that a cover band in a bar couldn't compete with anyway. But for more casual decisions - should we go to a bar or the movies? Which bar? - if they get a notice that YOUR band will be playing X bar on Friday, that's the moment to shape their decision.
     
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  8. Bunk McNulty

    Bunk McNulty It is not easy to do simple things correctly Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 2012
    Northampton, MA
    We usually announce gigs no more than two weeks in advance; when we play one club on Friday and another on Saturday, we'll put them side by side. We don't have a dedicated website, just fazebook. Once a quarter, our BL will post two months' worth of upcoming gigs. The only ones who need to see the entire calendar are the club owners, and most of that stuff is booked in September/October of the previous year. Oh, and once in a while a three-fer, like this:
    redhead3.jpeg
     
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  9. 40Hz

    40Hz Supporting Member

    May 24, 2006
    home
    Which is fine as long as none of your fans or target venues figure that out. Nobody likes being handed a line. That's the sort of plan that backfires more often than not. And word that somebody is full if it gets around very quickly these days.

    Best keep whatever you put up on the web completely on the level. It's just too easy to check up on things.

    Or so I think anyway. YMMV.
     
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