soft strings?

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by maniacal302, Jan 14, 2001.

  1. maniacal302


    Jan 14, 2001
    I've been playing bass for about 2-3 years now. I still consider myself an advanced beginner because I havent taken lessons and am somewhat decent on the bass. In any case, I have an Epiphone rip off of a Squier bass and in the time that I've been using it I have been using ghs boomers and other low quality strings. When I've used these strings I've noticed theyre hard and heavy and leave me with gross, calloused skin. I was wondering which string makers make strings that feel much softer, and what the difference is.
    i know this sounds like a stupid question but im a stupid guy
  2. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Callouses are a fact of life for bassplayers, particularly if you use roundwounds, but they shouldn't be "gross" after a couple years of playing, assuming you play almost everyday.

    If you have well-formed callouses, you should be able to use about any string guages you want, roundwounds or flatwounds, with minimal discomfort.

    As XavierG alluded to in one of his points, perhaps your bass isn't set up properly for you. That is, the strings are too high off the neck. That could be due to the bridge/saddle heigth, or the neck needing adjusmet.

    If your fingering/picking hand has bad callouses, your pickups may need to be raised. You may be trying to get more volume by attacking the strings too hard. (Or your amp isn't packing the weight).
  3. maniacal302


    Jan 14, 2001
    i use .045-.105 roundwound ghs boomers. i think that the times i was using other bassists basses the strings might have felt more comfortable because the quality of the bass was better, but i am certain that there must be some strings that arent nearly as harsh to my fingers as these ones.
  4. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    manical302- No doubt about it, there are. I got a new bass last month and the factory roundwounds it came with were like playing barbed wire. I promptly threw on a set Detroit Bass roundwounds from Compared to the factory strings, they are a big relief and sound fine to boot. I've tried a lot of strings in my 30+ years of "bassing." I've not played Boomers, (a lot of TalkBassers hate them), but if you're interested in the strings I mention, they're $11 a set, (shipping included), come with a money back guarantee, and they explain at the website why they are so inexpensive. Thomastik Infelds are also very comfortable and expensive.
  5. MJB


    Mar 17, 2000
    Try some pressurewound, tapewound or flatwound strings. I highly recommend TI Jazz flats, they're sticky until broken in then just great, YMMV. Oh, if you're a slapper you're just gonna have to get used to rounds. :D
  6. Discrepancy

    Discrepancy Guest

    In Musicains friend, there is a Bass called the DeArmound Ashboury. It has silicon rubber strings. I have no idea if you can buy them, but if you can, your fingers won't hurt and they should sound better.
  7. Nate Dawg

    Nate Dawg

    Apr 8, 2000
    Denver, CO
    Those silicon rubber strings only work with the Ashbory. They will not work on a "regular" bass that has magnetic pickups.
  8. Tsal


    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    Umm perhaps they will work if you have piezo bridge and 20" scale bass? (I don't know how piezo actually works, so I have to guess.. does it pick the vibrations of the string?)

    But you could switch to Ashbory tho :D
  9. Paul A

    Paul A

    Dec 13, 1999
    Hertfordshire U.K!
    How about trying "Rotosound 55's".
    These are black Nylon coated roundwounds,they sound and feel great.
  10. neptoon


    Jul 25, 2000
    summerville, sc
    you could also try using nickel strings. i've found that they are a lot less harsh than their stainless steel brethren. i like warwick yellow labels and slowounds, personally. my .02...
  11. mr t

    mr t

    Aug 24, 2000
    manhattan, ks
    dr sunbeams are soft *and* flexible