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solfege

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by b0nes83, Dec 11, 2001.


  1. b0nes83

    b0nes83

    Dec 14, 2000
    How important is this solfege to you? are you good at it? good at sight reading solfege?


    I think it is very important to learn this "solfege" because it is a good way to train your ear. also if you pick up a sheet of music you can hear what it sounds like w/ out picking up an instrument. I think im pretty good at it, I took a sight singing class and now im taking an aural skills class and it is very important to know the solfege for that. let me get some feed back here. peace
    Chad
     
  2. I'm lost... :confused:
     
  3. *ToNeS*

    *ToNeS*

    Jan 12, 2001
    Sydney AU
    i'm loster... :confused: :confused:
     
  4. I'm lostest... :(
     
  5. ok.. I'm not lost any more...

    Solfege:
    Ear-training by singing exercises to sol-fa syllables. More advanced forms are sung to vowels known as vocalizzi (lt.) or vocalises (Fr.).
     
  6. Shumph

    Shumph

    Aug 25, 2001
    On the move
    I do it I am pretty good at it too.
    Its just when you change key and do(h) moves I get confused.
    I think it is great for being able to "hear" a peice of music. Also my kids get a real kick when I paractice :) (I conduct when I practice)


    S
     
  7. Now that I have started playing the DB I regret not spending more time and effort with solfege.

    I do it now but still have a ways to go, if only I had not pushed it to the side when I started on BG.
     
  8. Josh Ryan

    Josh Ryan - that dog won't hunt, Monsignor. Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 24, 2001
    I'm OK at it. I could be better. I also get lost changing keys. I sort of need a reminder note.
     
  9. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    I like this thread in GEN INSTR.
     
  10. chickeNeck

    chickeNeck

    Dec 6, 2001
    It sounds like you use only the "Movable" Do system.

    The Fixed Do system means Do is C (or C#/Cb) all the time. So if you're singing in the key of A, La is tonic - ya dig?

    This form of solfege is a little tricky at first if your a fan of Fixed Do, but it's ultimately a lot easier.

    --- I'd get a real hoot out of watching you conduct when you practice too - I usually keep both hands on the bass. (j/k)

     
  11. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I think that singing named pitches is probably the most productive thing anyone can to if they want to learn to play melodically. If you are into understanding harmonic theory, I would strongly recommend singing using the "numbers system" instead of the solfege syllables, (do=1; re=2; mi=3 etc...) because when you start looking at complex chord structures, they won't make any sense to your ears unless you are able to translate the symbols into sound.

    For example, to someone who sings by the numbers of scale degrees, the chord symbols "C7sus", or "G7#9(#5)" make perfect sense as SOUNDS that are easy to hear and understand. To someone who doesn't sing, or who doesn't put together the relation of chord symbol alterations to scale degrees of a corresponding scale, these symbols often look like gibberish.
     
  12. Shumph

    Shumph

    Aug 25, 2001
    On the move
    Chris,
    Are you saying that the numbers system is like the movable do (which is what I learned) but using numbers instead? Or is it fixed?
    Also are you saying you are singing chords? :eek: I know what you mean I think.

    Solfege has helped me quite a bit but somteimes I get really pissed off at it. Esp. when some of my (home)work is in that damed treble clef. I am definatly willing to try a new approach and the number system sounds cool. Any links or book recomendations?



    S
     
  13. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I don't know of any books, but try analyzing anything that you normally play and singing the melodies/improvisations in the key of the song using the numbers. This really speeds up the process of learning what specific character each scale degree has. After a while, you'll hear a note in your head, realize that it's the 7th degree of the scale or whatever, and play it automatically without even thinking about it. When that starts to happen, so does the music.
     
  14. Shumph

    Shumph

    Aug 25, 2001
    On the move
    so does it go like this:
    instead of saying do I say 1 correct? (I know I am a little slow on the uptake somtimes)

    do re me fa so la ti do
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1

    I want to get this right because I feel it does help.
    The only problem is I have 3 more semesters of ear training and this may conflict with the system they teach. But no law says I can't learn it on my own huh?

    Thanks for the help.



    S
     
  15. b0nes83

    b0nes83

    Dec 14, 2000
    this numbering system has its pros and cons.
    i would sound good in a major key. but what about minor and all the other modes and minor keys. people are going to get use to hearing 1 3 or Do Mi...but what if it was in minor. 1 3 or Do Me.
    how could you tell the difference between 1 3 and 1 3? peace
    Chad
     
  16. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    This forces awareness of the construction of the scale you're in, which is a good thing. If you really want to be meticulous about it, you could sing "flat 3" or "flat 7" for minor...the important thing is that you are understanding the interval in your mind. This also means that you'll automatically understand altered chord symbols better, since you'll only be raising or lowering scale tones you've already sung by a half step.
     
  17. b0nes83

    b0nes83

    Dec 14, 2000
    instead of always starting on 1(do) in major, minor you can start on 6(la) and sing it in regular solfege or numbering system that way it will not mess with the relationships between each interval...which bring me to another question. when doing intervals you usually get the tonic and then a note in the scale or out of the scale. when saying of that is a Third. you need to make sure that you can distiniguish(sp) the sound of a major.minor 3rd. thats where this number system has its downfalls. peace
    Chad
     
  18. The way I was taught is to sing the interval name (similiar to what Chris is saying) i.e. root, minor 2nd, major 2nd, minor 3rd, major 3rd, perfect 4th, tri-tone, perfect 5th, minor 6th, major 6th, minor 7th, major 7th, octave (root) .

    I agree that, no matter which system you use, it's very beneficial. Which reminds me, I haven't been practising this for awhile. I'm going to start including it in me practices again.
     
  19. chickeNeck

    chickeNeck

    Dec 6, 2001
    "Deck the halls with boughs of holly,
    Fa la la la la la, la la la la."

    Ooops, I mean:

    "Deck the halls with boughs of holly,

    Ra Me Fa Ra Me, Ra Do Ti Do."

    :D
     
  20. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    NEKKED CHICK,

    Now THERE'S the Christmas spirit! For the jazzers, that's,

    2 3 4 2 3___ 2 1 7 1__


    And for the hardcore "outside" jazzers, that's

    2 3 #4 2 #9___ b9 1 b7 1

    :)