Songbooks with fingerings anotation : jazz bass on top

Discussion in 'Double Bass Pedagogy [DB]' started by Mister Cbass, May 4, 2020.

  1. Mister Cbass

    Mister Cbass

    Jun 30, 2011
    France
    Hello,

    I'm working on this songbook
    Bass Standards - Classic Jazz Masters Series

    But there is no fingerings anoted.
    I've tried the first song, blues minor ( Coltrane ) on a slow tempo, I've not problem with some part, but in the first measures, we shift on the position on the C ( E string). That's ok and logical.... but I'm not sure of the fingering.

    Did you've worked with this songbook, is there some fingering annotation available on the web ?

    Is it possible to share with you some parts to have your opinion ?
    Edit
    found on scribd, I share just the measures I need help
    View attachment 3814279

    Here an another book, with fingerings. I don't get it at this time, but maye it could help to learn and play the other books

    Jazz Bass on Top - A Guide to Left-Hand Technique

    looks good to me, nice collection of songs.

    Thanks for your advise.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2020
  2. Mister Cbass

    Mister Cbass

    Jun 30, 2011
    France
    Here
    blue minor.JPG

    Page 9
    Bass Standards: Classic Jazz Masters Series

    After I play the high F on the G string, I must play the F on the A with the finger 1 ? I think start play the 8va there. ( 4th measure) and not go play the F on D strings. Am I right ? these 5 measures are not clear to me ( wich fingerings must I use ?)
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2020
  3. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    High D to F? Do you mean in bars 4 and 5? The 8va is just for convenience in reading, because the line goes up to a D two octaves above the open D string. That would be a lot of ledger lines!!!

    Bar 4 is F (on G string) to the F an octave below, so I would finger the high F with my pinky and the low F with my index finger on the A. Then it's back to the G string for Db and E then the 8va starts with F, etc. (transition into thumb position) with the highest note being the D in bar 7. The transition between bar 8 and 9 is where the notation drops out of 8va with Bb (bar 8) to Cb (bar 9). Because there are no large interval jumps, I'd stay on the G string through the entire 8va section until bar 8, where I'd play the G harmonic to ease the jump down to A on the 3rd beat. I'm sure other folks might fret the G and shift over to the D string instead for the A, still a jump but half as far.

    Hopefully a more seasoned player with a larger brain than mine will suggest other, better strategies.
     
  4. Mister Cbass

    Mister Cbass

    Jun 30, 2011
    France
    Hello,

    Thanks for your answer :thumbsup:

    "High D to F? Do you mean in bars 4 and 5? The 8va is just for convenience in reading, because the line goes up to a D two octaves above the open D string. That would be a lot of ledger lines!!!"

    Yes. Bar 4, Mystake, F to F ( edit). Ok that's the fingering I've used.
    4( G string), 1 ( A string), back on th g to play D and E flat, and then on the bar 5, start the F ( A string) with first finger etc ....


    .(transition into thumb position) with the highest note being the D in bar 7.

    No sure here, due to the tempo---> to play D flat and D sharp -> second finger and next third finger. ( not the thumb ?)

    I will try with my db this evening and note the fingering I will use.
     
  5. Silevesq

    Silevesq

    Oct 2, 2010
    Quebec
    There is a part of me that feel like telling you to do whatever you want...

    But thing is there is multiple way of playing this line and even if you had a video recording of what actually happens in the studio, it could be "wrong".

    The problem in jazz is that it is improvisation. Even if you want to have perfect position and what not in the end, it should be your ear that dictates where to go, or even in sight-reading, you won't have time to find the perfect placement.

    When working on a piece, there is multiple approach to this. Some say that you should stay as much as possible in one position. To me this is more an EB approach. There is also trying to fit every measure in a position based on the first note of the measure. It all depends on what you want to hear in the phrasing of your line.

    I like to find a way that I change position most of the time on the second beat. I like the phrasing that it gives. 1, 2 3 4 1, 2 3 4... Some like 1 2 3 4, 1 2 3 4. It is a matter of taste and will change the sound/fingering of the line.

    Here's my attempt at playing the line you wanted. I tried to vary it a little.

    PS: it's p. 6 in my book...
     
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  6. Mister Cbass

    Mister Cbass

    Jun 30, 2011
    France
    Thanks a lot your video will be really useful :hyper:
     
  7. If you take the time to learn the fingerboard, you don't even think about fingerings when working on a piece of music, at least for your first pass. You develop a system that gets you around the fingerboard logically and it will work for most of what you want to play on the bass.
     
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  8. Mister Cbass

    Mister Cbass

    Jun 30, 2011
    France
    Yes, I got the point, for the moment I'm working with the Ray Brow's method. Really helpful.
    I have also started to work on thumb position technique.
    And I must admit that for the moment, this " area" of the neck and how to manage it, still difficult for me.

    I think also that the song choosed ( blues minor Coltrane) is not appropiated for a beguiner ( I' m challeging myself with it, but maybe I must choose an another one)