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Sorry, iPod Related Tech Question...

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by BassGod, Apr 17, 2006.


  1. BassGod

    BassGod

    Jan 21, 2004
    ...Again. I was looking on the Apple site for some tips to preserve my battery, and it said using "normal size" files was best. It claimed that normal was about 9MB. It said to compress big files and such. Now, I have many files that are over 9MB. Just for example, 'Comfortably Numb' is 69.6MB.

    So obviously I need to make these files smaller. Should I convert them all to AAC, WAV, or mp3?

    I converted a Black Sabbath song that was 55.4MB to AAC, which made it about 5MB. But it kept both the 5MB and the 55MB versions in the library (as opposed to just deleting the larger file and keeping the small one). So obviously this is a problem, because if I convert all 900 songs in the library, I'm gonna end up with 1800, all of them doubles. So when I connect my iPod next, and it updates, I'll have 1800 doubles.

    Help?

    Graeme
     
  2. Minger

    Minger

    Mar 15, 2004
    Rochester, NY
    Erm, this is going to be a stupid question, but why do you keep such large files,, assuming they're WAV's? Why not use FLAc or soem lossless codec; you get about half the size.

    Anyways, you can manually remove the larger files if you want from teh library by deleting them...
     
  3. jkritchey

    jkritchey

    Jul 23, 2002
    Northern Va.
    Sounds to me like you are storing your original files as WAV files, which are completely uncompressed, and is the native format when ripping, before encoding. When you then convert them, (I'm not sure what you are using, iTunes?) it is creating a new file, not replacing the original.

    The choice is yours, but I find the VBR MP3's sound good enough that I safely convert most WAV's to that format, and either replace the WAV, or delete the WAV after converting. I don't care for AAC, personal preference.

    BTW, I'm not sure what any of this has to do with battery life.
     
  4. secretdonkey

    secretdonkey

    Oct 9, 2002
    Austin, TX
    Yes, why do you have uncompressed files? I'm not familiar with FLAc but iTunes does offer a lossless format as an option.

    Assuming you have reasons, here are a couple of things you can do:

    1. Create a playlist - a smart playlist that excludes large files. Then set the pod to only transfer selected playlists - namely, that one.

    2. Uncheck the large files and set the pod to only transfer checked songs.

    Hope that helps.
     
  5. BassGod

    BassGod

    Jan 21, 2004
    Yes this does help. I have no reasons as to why I'm using WAV files. I just put my CDs in and clicked 'Import'.

    Also, I have no idea what this has to do with battery life. The Apple site says that larger files apparently shorten the iPod's battery life, for some reason.

    Finally, I have one more question: can I recharge the iPod whenever I want, or is it best to wait until it has no juice left?

    Thanks,
    Graeme
     
  6. bannedwit

    bannedwit

    May 9, 2005
    Buffalo, NY
    Couple things I do...

    First off, I set the "RIP" options as the highest quality MP3 file.
    Ripping is when you take a CD and put it to your hard drive (the opposite of "burning")

    Next, I have Adobe Audition where you can edit music files. I take the songs on the CD's that are super long (like the ones that have secret songs after like 20 minutes of dead air) and chop out the silence so it goes track 1 second then the secret song.

    There are audio conversion and audio file editors that you can download and/or buy. Just do a search on google for them.

    That should help out with the ITunes issues.
     
  7. bannedwit

    bannedwit

    May 9, 2005
    Buffalo, NY
    On that note, I am guessing that you are using Windows Media Player to import the tracks. Try using ITunes for this.
    First go to options in ITunes and set the RIPPING to MP3 and highest quality. Everything you "import" / "rip" will be an mp3 from then on in ITunes.

    Put in your CD and then click on it when it shows up in ITunes (same part where the playlists show up on the left)
    Click on the CD and it will show the tracks to it.

    In the upper right, you will see a circle that says "RIP" click on it and you should get it to rip the music right to your ITunes folder under My Music and even label the tracks for you (if connected to the internet) AND put the songs in your library
     
  8. jkritchey

    jkritchey

    Jul 23, 2002
    Northern Va.
    Hmm, it appears from your profile that you are not old enough to remember the early days of ripping and the importance of file compression. Back in the old days, home computers had tiny hard drives in comparison to now. My first PC had 40 MB (yep), my second had 580 mb, and my third 10 GB. So in order to store music files on your hard drive, they had to come up with Compression methods. By far the most successful has been MP3. If you rip files directly from a CD with out converting them, they are WAV files.

    Early on their was a lot of griping that the MP3 compression was ruining the music's sound quailty. (What the compressors do is eliminate the music spectrum that most people can't hear, theoretically). So a variety of other compression formats were developed. They include WMV (microsoft) AAC (Apple), FLAC, Ogg Vorbis, SHN (or Shorten) and the list goes on.

    SHN, FLAC and perhaps others are what's know as Lossless. They compress with out discarding any of the sound spectrum. However, while they are smaller than WAV, they are still MUCH bigger than MP3.

    MP3 compression has gotten better in the past few years, and if you are ripping from your Studio CD collection, you should be just fine converting to Variable Bit Rate (VBR) with a minimum setting of 192; I BELEIVE that you will be satisfied with both the sound, and the size.

    This is just off the top of my head; YMMV, etc. I hope it helps.
     
  9. secretdonkey

    secretdonkey

    Oct 9, 2002
    Austin, TX
    Large files compromise battery life because the Pod has to fire up the hard drive to reload RAM more often.

    Given that it's not difficult to replace an iPod battery (though certainly not as simple as it should be) I would suggest that your convenience should dictate when and how you recharge.

    I have read that letting the battery run down to the 10%-20% level before recharging will give you a marginal improvement in battery life. I can't verify that for you.

    :)
     
  10. Set it to rip in iTunes for a 320K stereo mp3. Don't use AAC3 unless you only want to ever play those files in iTunes, or on an iPod.
     
  11. jkritchey

    jkritchey

    Jul 23, 2002
    Northern Va.
    More on file compression. Clicky Clicky

    Edit: It's an old link, but shows how we got where we are today....
     
  12. There's no benefit WHATSOEVER of having an mp3 file at 320k bit rate. Why? The whole point of an iPod, or other mp3 media players is to listen to the music on the fly or on the run. You are only ever going to truely see the benefits of such a high encoding rates if you then listen back to the music through a really high end speaker system or headphone set! And then yo would have to be in an environment that is free of external noise and interference to fully get the benefits!Through normal headphones for everyday use (ie out on the street or in the car etc) I would recommend Apples own AAC format at 160k. This is comparable to a 192k mp3 encoding but considerably smaller. The only down side to this is that you can only run these files on iTunes and your iPod, no big deal really. When Apple's website states a normal files size, it's making refernce to a 128k AAC file which iTunes (on a Mac anyway) is set to decode at by default. Go to Preferences/Advanced/Importing to change your encoding options in iTunes.
     

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