Soundpost grain

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by Rowka, Apr 16, 2003.

  1. Rowka

    Rowka Supporting Member

    Dec 9, 2002
    Jacksonville, FL
    I just noticed the grain on my sounpost runs perpendicular to the strings. How big of a problem is that?
  2. None. That's the way it is supposed to be.
  3. Rowka

    Rowka Supporting Member

    Dec 9, 2002
    Jacksonville, FL
    I thought the grain was supposed to run parallel with the strings. So the grain on the soundpost was lined up with the grain on the top.
  4. arnoldschnitzer

    arnoldschnitzer AES Fine Instruments

    Feb 16, 2002
    Brewster, NY, USA
  5. mhartery


    Jun 27, 2002
    What about width of grain in the sound post? Should a post have wide grain to transmit low frequency better as wide grain tops some times do? or does it not matter? can a close grain post have a effect on the sound?:bassist:
  6. I'm usually more concerned with the relative hardness of the soundpost rather than the number of grains per inch. Wide grain soundpost do tend to be softer than narrower grain posts, but not always. Of course, every bass is different, but generally carved basses need a soft post. However, many plywoods and some carved respond better with a harder post. I try to keep several different hardnesses of soundpost blanks in my shop (I make my own). Finding what sounds best is sometimes just a matter of experimenting till you find what hardness works best for a particular instrument. I once replaced the soundpost on an old Kay bass with a nice soft European spruce post. It took all the life out of the sound. After that, I stopped wondering why Kay put what looked to be maple or basswood as the soundpost in some basses when they were originally made.
  7. basswraith


    Mar 10, 2003
    thanx for the reply
    my bass is an old french Jaquet circa 1880. IM sure this isnt going to behave like a Kay bass.
  8. That's what makes it interesting. You never know for sure till you try it.