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Spalted Maple as a tonewood?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by ClaytonH, Apr 26, 2009.


  1. ClaytonH

    ClaytonH

    Mar 10, 2009
    Hudson, OH
    Over the summer I'm just itchin to build my self a acoustic.
    I've been looking at some on the market and I've seen the new Ibanez Exoctic wood Fretless. The whole body's been made of spalted maple. I'v heard it and it sounds nice. Well my real question is if they realy mad it from spalted maple or if they just painted some other wood like spalted maple.

    looks like this:
    [​IMG]
    Ohh yea... and if would bloodwood work for the finger board.
     
  2. Sardine

    Sardine

    Feb 2, 2009
    Maine
    I doubt a spalted top could stand the string tension. It's probably just a veneer over a laminated top, but don't quote me on that.
     
  3. Hi Clayton,

    Technically speaking, spalted wood is moldy & structurally very weak. I seriously doubt you could a piece that is strong enough, and thin enough, to work.

    Spalted maple makes great eye candy, but it has is challenges as well.

    Take care,

    edg
     
  4. vbasscustom

    vbasscustom

    Sep 8, 2008
    yeah, its probably like a spruce top with spalted maple veneer or something similar
    and yes, bloodwood makes a great fingerboard
     
  5. T2W

    T2W

    Feb 24, 2007
    Montreal, Canada.
    MayBe ye Cann put a caccobobolo fingerfretboard too !
     
  6. ClaytonH

    ClaytonH

    Mar 10, 2009
    Hudson, OH
    what about the back? Does it really mater what wood to use?
     
  7. vbasscustom

    vbasscustom

    Sep 8, 2008
    no, the back and sides are really up to you. you can use what ever wood you want, i but i still wouldnt use spalted maple.
     
  8. ClaytonH

    ClaytonH

    Mar 10, 2009
    Hudson, OH
    Yea, Im probly use something cheap at woodworkers source.com. just cheaking though. And arn't the braces spruce?
     
  9. vbasscustom

    vbasscustom

    Sep 8, 2008
    yes
     
  10. mikeyswood

    mikeyswood Banned

    Jul 22, 2007
    Cincinnati OH
    Luthier of Michael Wayne Instruments
    YES

    Full acoustic material does matter and even the bracing pattern matters. EVERYTHING matters in an acoustic.

    Solid bodies do not matter since 99% of the sound is in the strings and pickups.

    If you are using electric pickups in an acoustics then materials do not matter as much.
     
  11. ClaytonH

    ClaytonH

    Mar 10, 2009
    Hudson, OH
    Well then, Mr. Mikey,
    What woods should i ues, and what bracing pattern should i use?(diagrams please)
     
  12. Sardine

    Sardine

    Feb 2, 2009
    Maine
    While I agree that the material of pretty much everything in an acoustic does matter, the top is the most important component. Torres proved this by making a guitar with a spruce top, and a back and sides of paper mache.;) It is true, though, that a good acoustic is more than the sum of the parts. I would suggest mahogany, because it is light, fairly cheap, and acoustically responsive, not to mention time-tested to the nth degree. But if you want to use something less typical, go for it!
     
  13. ClaytonH

    ClaytonH

    Mar 10, 2009
    Hudson, OH
    I can see where your going at this. I'm designing mine off of the Kinal Kompact. I'm having trouble finding bracing patterns. if you can give me a list of basic ones (with pictures) that would be nice!(pdf prefferably)
     
  14. mikeyswood

    mikeyswood Banned

    Jul 22, 2007
    Cincinnati OH
    Luthier of Michael Wayne Instruments
    stew-mac.com search for patterns

    amazon.com search for guitar building

    And the top is the most important since it is what is vibrating. Long grain woods work better and they are made even better by being hollow. Stradivari reached fame by using wood that had been submerged and the sap removed.
     

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