1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Spanish Rosetta Stone vs FLVS (Florida Virtual School)

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by PRUNEFACE, May 17, 2011.


  1. Hello all!
    I am currently debating finishing a FLVS course (I have completed one semester of Spanish II, so I would be doing the second) or using Rosetta Stone -which I already own. I need to reach a high enough level to be able to function in an IB Spanish SL (in the first of the two years). I can always fall back on IB ab Initio, but I would much prefer to be in the Standard Level and I feel I can reach that goal. I am unsure of what I should do, and while I know, in the end, it's what I feel would work best, I would also like to hear what you would do. I have every level of Spanish (Spain) v.4 and totale (the online portion) of the Rosetta Stone program. I also have access to the second semester of the Spanish II course because I live in Florida. So both are just as "accessible" although one is for a grade, which adds a little stress even though I am good at languages.
    Finally:
    I would rather do one or the other... Both would simply demand too much time and there would be quite a bit of overlap.
    Anyways... Done with this rambling post. Would appreciate your responses!
     
  2. MatticusMania

    MatticusMania LANA! HE REMEMBERS ME!

    Sep 10, 2008
    Pomona, SoCal
    You dont need to know Spanish, youre a Dick Tracy villian, you have writers to worry about your dialouge... (Im sure they can translate)
     
  3. true.
     
  4. Stu L.

    Stu L.

    Nov 27, 2001
    Corsicana, Texas
    I'm curious about the Rosetta Stone system myself. Isn't it kind of expensive? Why consider the other option if you've already bought RS? Any true success stories out there?
     
  5. bongomania

    bongomania Commercial User

    Oct 17, 2005
    PDX, OR
    owner, OVNIFX and OVNILabs
    At a certain level, I think it's necessary to have a human listen to you speak, and offer corrections. It's one thing to get some book larnin', but another to actually speak the language.

    Classic example: I had some Spanish lessons on tape (cassettes!) from one of the major brands of lessons/dictionaries, and they taught me to say "encantado de conocerla" when meeting a woman. I learned to say it perfectly. Then, I used it when meeting a Cuban woman, and she just laughed. :) Fortunately it was just cheesy and not offensive, but you get the idea--a real human Spanish teacher would have given me a more realistic usage.
     
  6. fmoore200

    fmoore200

    Mar 22, 2011
    NYC
    That would have been funny. 'Mucho gusto' is just fine in any situation. Sometimes people try to get too fancy when learning a language - the basics are the most important and getting your accent down.

    I agree that a human teacher would help, but nothing teaches like experience (even if the experience is funny/humiliating). So if you do use a software program get as much practice speaking with native speakers.

    Talking to a computer screen or a teacher will only do so much. People in the real world have different dialects, speech impediments, etc... (I believe in Spain there are something like 5 national languages) Get into the real world and make an @** of yourself! It's the best way..
     
  7. fmoore200

    fmoore200

    Mar 22, 2011
    NYC
    But the real question: did you get the Cuban woman's number? :D
     
  8. bongomania

    bongomania Commercial User

    Oct 17, 2005
    PDX, OR
    owner, OVNIFX and OVNILabs
    Yes. ;)
     
  9. fmoore200

    fmoore200

    Mar 22, 2011
    NYC
    Que buenoooooo, jaja <<<Spanish haha
     
  10. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Apr 12, 2001
    Olympia, WA
    We downloaded the free trial of RS, the wife and I are going to learn Spanish. We are also signed up for lessons with a couple from Mexico living near us now. Those two combined should give us a good foundation to work from. RS for the fundamentals, and the personalized lessons for conversational Spanish.

    I figure if they start off with teaching us how to order food, then I'll be fine from there. :D

    -Mike
     
  11. Stu L.

    Stu L.

    Nov 27, 2001
    Corsicana, Texas
    2 years of Spanish in HS and I can order a burrito with the best gringos out there :D
     
  12. I used Rossetta stone to try to learn portuguese I was on it for 4 months and barely learned anything and I was doing 2 hours a day five days a week, it didn't help. It also was way to expensive, I'd say stick with the FLVS Spanish course. I'm in COVA (Colorado Virtual Academy) doing the Spanish 2 course and thankfully almost done.
     
  13. fmoore200

    fmoore200

    Mar 22, 2011
    NYC
    Were you only using the software? It should come with a disclaimer, lol, you really have to practice daily in real life situations with native speakers. I don't know where you live, but if there isn't a large Brazilian or Portuguese population it will be very difficult to gain the requisite practice. Imo.
     
  14. I really like Rosetta Stone, and, with the internet as a supplement, I feel I can learn just as much. My bass teacher is a native speaker (of Spanish) so I can practice it if I get confident enough to begin a conversation.
    The only downside is: no grade. I dont think I have time to do both.

    And Stu. L:
    It is rather expensive but I feel worth it (at least now.) With the online portion (totale) you have a MAJOR resource. You get what are essentially tutoring sessions online in the native langauge (no English allowed) AND the ability to play games with other people learning the language AND (to me one of the best parts) the ability to talk to, play games with, people who speak (in my case, Spanish) natively learning my native language (English). It's really cool!
     
  15. Yes I was. I was using it to prepare me for my youth exchange to Brazil for one year. Needless to say being in Brazil helped a lot more than using software.

    Pruneface I would suggest asking your Bass Teacher to speak to you in Spanish a lot, your brain if it is surrounded by Spanish will start learning the language itself.
     
  16. MatticusMania

    MatticusMania LANA! HE REMEMBERS ME!

    Sep 10, 2008
    Pomona, SoCal
    At the same time, there are differences in dialect and meaning amongst various Spanish speaking countries. I learned that taking Spanish in High School. A word might mean one thing in Cuba, and something entirely different in another Spanish speaking country.

    Best way to learn Spanish: take an introductory course in school, then get real world experience by working as a cook at Booger King.
     
  17. bongomania

    bongomania Commercial User

    Oct 17, 2005
    PDX, OR
    owner, OVNIFX and OVNILabs
    I'm just glad I didn't ask if I could eat some of her papaya!



    ...at least, not right away...
     
  18. no. just no. :ninja:
     
  19. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Apr 12, 2001
    Olympia, WA
    Or on a construction site. I learned more Spanish when I was a drywall finisher than I ever did in the high school class I took.

    -Mike
     
  20. I have the RS for Japanese, haven't gone very far into it so don't have much opinion yet. I spoke with a person who has been taking Japanese in college, working on a degree specifically in Japanese, who has seen the RS program. He said that the RS program is very "situational", meaning that you don't really learn the language, per se, but rather how to interact in certain situations.

    He said you can usually spot people who have learned a language through RS, in any language, because they will "shoot off a robotic response" as soon as you finish your question/sentence. That and they can't respond, or not easily, to a "uncommon" topic.

    So, if you are just beginning, like me, I think RS would probably be a good way to start learning the language. However, if you already have the basics down, RS will not be very useful.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.