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Speaker Stacking

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by tombowlus, May 14, 2003.


  1. tombowlus

    tombowlus If it sounds good, it is good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    North central Ohio
    Editor-in-Chief, Bass Gear Magazine
    I recently picked up a couple of new cabs, an Epifani T-112 and T-110UL, and now I am wondering about various ways to stack them. The straightforward way would be to stack them on top of each other in their intended orientation, like this:

    [​IMG]

    However, with the handles being on top of the cabinets, the handle on the T-110UL interferes with placing my Walkabout head on top, as the Walkabout does not have feet (and wouldn't fit into its gig back if I added feet to it). This can cause scratches on the bottom of my Walkabout (unless I use a towel between the two, which I do) and does not make for a very stable head. Brett at Epifani suggested that I screw some rubber furniture feet onto the top of the T-110UL to rest the Walkabout on, and this may be the ticket if I stick with the "normal" orientation.

    However, another possibility is stacking each cabinet on its end, like the photo below. This has the advantage of getting the cabs up higher (and closer to my ears), and gives me a nice place to set my Walkabout. I suppose that there might be a little reduced low end from less floor coupling. Also, the ports are now going to be aligned differently relative to the floor. To me, I also seem to hear a little less focus to the mids in this vertical orientation, though I wonder if that is my ears playing tricks on me.

    Yet another stacking option would be to have the T-112 on its side, and the T-110UL on top in the "normal" orientation. While the T-112 is about as tall as the T-110UL is wide, the two do not stack perfectly in this arrangement and the corners do not lock. I don't have a photo of this arrangement, but to me it doesn't look as nice as the other two options, partly because the Epifani badges are not oriented the same way (though I suppose I could always change that).

    I know that this is somewhat of a trivial topic, but I have been wracking my brain over it, and thought that I would solicit some input from you wise men (and women?).

    Any thoughts, comments, suggestions are appreciated.

    Thanks, Tom.
     
  2. Nate Dawg

    Nate Dawg

    Apr 8, 2000
    Denver, CO
    I like the second option (both of them on their sides, like the second photo). It makes the rig look bigger, which is always a good thing :D . The decrease in floor coupling should be negligible, but don't quote me on that. I think being able to hear yourself onstage outweighs the loss in coupling.

    I suspect that the coupling factor is somehow related to the amount of surface area between the floor and the cabinet (linear relationship, maybe?).
     
  3. tombowlus

    tombowlus If it sounds good, it is good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    North central Ohio
    Editor-in-Chief, Bass Gear Magazine
    Yeah, it does look bigger stacked this way:
    :D


    [​IMG]

    And as an added bonus, it also takes up less floor space!

    I will have to go back and do some listening tests again, but the wierd thing is that decrease in the focus and clarity of the mids when stacking it vertically versus horizontally. I can't explain why it would do that, but I thought that I heard a difference. Again, it could be my ears playing a trick on me...

    Or, it might be that I had the fronts of the cabs lined up better when they were stacked horizontally. Looking at that picture more closely, I may have had the T-110UL sitting back a bit too far. I will definitely have to redo my test.

    Tom.
     
  4. Nate Dawg

    Nate Dawg

    Apr 8, 2000
    Denver, CO
    If you want a somewhat controlled test, play blindfolded (or with you back to the stack) and have somebody else change the configuration for you without telling you what they did. That way, you can pick the one that sounds best.
     
  5. tombowlus

    tombowlus If it sounds good, it is good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    North central Ohio
    Editor-in-Chief, Bass Gear Magazine
    Or, since I don't often have someone around willing to help me, I could blindfold myself, and then change them around!

    Er, wait a minute...
     
  6. tornadobass

    tornadobass Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Iowa City, Iowa
    Endorsing Artist: Black Diamond & SuperSensitive strings
    Another idea I've used...get one of those rubber keyboard wrist pads and stick it under the front of the amp. That'll lift the amp over the handle and damp vibration between amp and cab.
     
  7. vanselus

    vanselus

    Sep 20, 2000
    Boulder, CO
    None
    Let your ears be the judge - but remember it's not going to be the same in every situation. Sure it sounds "this way" stacked horiz and "that way" stacked vert - in your house. Try it in another location and it's going to sound totally different. You may even want different configs for different groups. Take my 2 GS112's. I prefer them stacked vert for the rock band, horiz for the blues. Could be in my head, or the physical height change, but I can totally hear the difference without looking. To me the vert lessens "boom" and adds focus, without losing as much grunt as taking the cabs completely off the ground.

    Give both ways a shot at your next gig or rehearsal! And definitely let us know how it goes :)
     
  8. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny

    Jan 19, 2002
    NY / NJ / PA
    i like the second option. looks cooler.

    but i too had the same prob with my EA iAMP & Bergantino 1x12 combo. didnt bother me much, tho.

    btw, nice pic! ;)
     
  9. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    I once read a text on orienting cabinets explaining how something as simple as repositioning the PORTS of the two cabs relative to each other could radically change the bass response of the stack :eek:

    You could always use the old 60s rock band solution: Stuff a piece of foam between the head and cab.
     
  10. cjgallen

    cjgallen

    Oct 19, 2001
    At practice I usually bring my 2x10 and sit it vertically, but this last time I sat it horizontally, and I could cut through easier and put less power to it. Kinda neat.
     
  11. tombowlus

    tombowlus If it sounds good, it is good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    North central Ohio
    Editor-in-Chief, Bass Gear Magazine
    brianrost wrote:

    "I once read a text on orienting cabinets explaining how something as simple as repositioning the PORTS of the two cabs relative to each other could radically change the bass response of the stack."

    That was one of my concerns, especially since the Epifani's use a rectangular port.

    vanselus wrote:

    "To me the vert lessens "boom" and adds focus, without losing as much grunt as taking the cabs completely off the ground."

    That is kind of what I would expect, except that at least in my prior experiments, the focus seemed better in the horizontal, versus vertical, position. But I do recall some threads on The Bottom Line where it was theorized that vertical stacking would enhance focus, so again, I didn't know if my ears were deceiving me.

    More tests are definitely needed. I'll report back later.

    Thanks for the replies, folks!

    Tom.
     
  12. Eric Moesle

    Eric Moesle Supporting Member

    Sep 21, 2001
    Columbus OH
    I noticed in the picture that you have the two speakers offset from each other front to back. You might want to keep the speakers themselves flush with each other, by staggering them an inch or so back from one another you are risking some strange phase cancellation in the frequency ocillations.
     
  13. tombowlus

    tombowlus If it sounds good, it is good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    North central Ohio
    Editor-in-Chief, Bass Gear Magazine
    Yeah, I saw that, too. This could have been the reason for the lack of "focus." When I do my next test, I will make sure that they are flush.

    Tom.
     
  14. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    believe it or not, this is covered briefly in the cookbook... you won't get any phase cancelation unless the speakers are more or less firing at each other. But moving speakers back and forth affects their dispersion characteristics. It's more of an issue when using 2 dramatically different sized speakers though. It shouldn't be an issue with this rig.