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Speakon retro fit

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by hexbass, Feb 7, 2006.


  1. Does any one retro fit amps for a speakon connector?
     
  2. Fred312b

    Fred312b What if I want to play jazz precisely? Supporting Member

    Apr 23, 2002
    Chicago, IL
    i'd like to know this too...
     
  3. tadawson

    tadawson

    Aug 24, 2005
    Lewisville, TX
    It kinda depends on the real estate in the amp. Most of the newer SS stuff has the jacks mounted to the PC board, and the speakons are just plain the wrong size. Tube gear, and SS stuff with chassis mounted jacks are easy, if the space permits . . . .

    Having said that, I have upgraded pretty much all my own stuff, but don't do repairs for a living . . . . and I haven't paid for a repair to any amp in my world in over 30 years . . . . I do my own . . . . . .

    So, not sure where to send you, but pretty much any tech should be able to do it. It consists of verify the space, enlarge the hole, and reconnect the two wires to the new connector. Hardly rocket science, and does not change the circuitry in the amp in any way.

    - Tim
     
  4. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    I have another idea. If you're using a rack, most racks have mount holes in the back too. Get a single space rack plate (a guy is selling 3 in the TB forsale area right now for $8 each) and make pigtails to go to the 1/4". You get the security of the speakons without mod'ing the amp, and you can do it yourself.

    http://www.neutrik.com/content/Products/products_group.asp?level2id=204_54361

    That's what I'd do, anyhoo... :)
     
  5. Eric Moesle

    Eric Moesle Supporting Member

    Sep 21, 2001
    Columbus OH
    I added a speakon to a Carvin DCM2000 power amp that didn't have one (bought it right before they started offering it as a feature). It was for bridged operation only.

    It was simple in THAT case because the internal electronics were such that the banana connectors had standard nuts and bolts on the inside of the case which they're wires were connected to, and I simply attached new wires leading to the speakon with "O" connectors on the ends of the wires, then re-screwed the bolts on the internal banana-end making contact. Looked like a pro-job, and it was easy.

    I cut the round hole in the chassis for the speakon connector using one of those "pyramid" shaped metal drill bits that drill a different wider diameter depending on how deep you go. Be sure to account for any loose metal shavings so they don't short out something inside your casing!
     
  6. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    I bought a sgl rack space panel with knockouts for XLR & Neutrik/Speakon panel mounts from Mid-Atlantic. Pop riveted in a couple of inches of Rack Rail to the back of my SKB non-rear rails rack for mounting. Put in two Xlr's for input, two Speakons for output. Now I don't have to root around in the rack plugging crap in. Acutaully I still have to 'cause I added some stuff and need two more inputs and two more outputs. Haven't gotten around to it yet.

    Depending on your needs you might be just as well off buying a 1/4 (or banana) to Speakon cable ...
     
  7. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    Yeah, good point... I should mention that my comments are assuming an adapter cable isn't a solution, because something is needed that can survive being tugged on.
     
  8. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    That's a good point. The jacks on my head are plastic. Lot's are today. They won't survive a direct attack and the repair could be expensive ...

    I run a GK rackable head in an SKB Shallow rack and keep my 1/4 cable in the amp all the time, so I added a bit of strain relief by ty-wrapping the cable inside. When I packup, I just toss the cable and power strip into the back of the rack, close up and i'm good to go.

    The other rack I was referring to is my PA rack...
     
  9. tadawson

    tadawson

    Aug 24, 2005
    Lewisville, TX
    And you get to keep the high failure rate of the 1/4" stuff. I think the entire point was to get rid of that problem area from the get-go. Your suggestion works well if you have binding posts or something substantial, though . . . .

    - Tim
     
  10. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    No, I understood. You're misunderstanding my post.

    I'm talking about fastening a rack panel to the back of the rack with screws, so the 1/4" plugs will never see any tugs, because they're just "internal jumpers" to the backpanel, which will never move. The back panel now has the (locking) speaker connectors screwed to it that are actually being used.

    Sure, someone could still reach into the rack and unplug the "pigtail(s)" between the amp and backpanel, but I doubt that's a real concern.
     
  11. tadawson

    tadawson

    Aug 24, 2005
    Lewisville, TX
    I get that. My point is that 1/4" plugs are not rated for anywhere near the wattage of modern bass gear, and are STILL a failure looking for a place to happen . . . . and speakons don't have that problem. Yes, your solution corrects the potential for mechanical damage and "pull outs" but is still not as good as an outright replacement in terms of reliability. Ever had a cab drop to half volume, only to go "jiggle" the 1/4" and have it come back? That's the kind of problems I have seen . . . .

    - Tim
     
  12. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    Ahhh, my bad. I was only considering the mechanical issues, not the electrical issues.