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specific bass for specific styles of music???

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Abluesbassist, Mar 2, 2006.


  1. what's your thoughts on this. for example old p bass for blues but not custom 6 string or custom 6 string for jazz/funk but not old p bass.

    agree or disagree??
     
  2. Sippy

    Sippy

    Aug 1, 2005
    Stuart,Florida
    Some basses do have a specific sound that works well with specific genres. But a good bass player can make any bass work in any situation.
     
  3. Agreed. Can't really imagine a Ric playing C&W, or a Steinberger playing rap though.....:meh:
     
  4. Agreed, but it would be interesting to show up with a Beast when you were backing up a gospel choir.
     
  5. flatwoundfender

    flatwoundfender

    Feb 24, 2005
    Well while I wouldn't use a 6 string for blues and pbass works for any genre. Take a look at jazz and funk players and you'll see quite a few pbasses. I mean as far as jazz a pbass with heavy gauge flats and foam can sound a lot like an upright.
     
  6. Sippy

    Sippy

    Aug 1, 2005
    Stuart,Florida
    Why not? I don't understand why a 6 string cannot work with blues?.
     
  7. Mark Wilson

    Mark Wilson Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jan 12, 2005
    Toronto, Ontario
    Endorsing Artist: Elixir® Strings
    Why not use a 6-string for blues? You could play some killer chords that would sound amazing.

    And, All basses sound different. I have a fretted P-bass, and a fretless Jazz bass. If I feel a song needs that Jamerson kinda tone, i'm use my P. If I feel it needs a bit more punch to it, i'll use my J.
    Also, tonal possibilities are ENDLESS with the amps and basses coming out now.


    -Mark
     
  8. flatwoundfender

    flatwoundfender

    Feb 24, 2005
    In my opinion a blues bass player shouldn't be playing chords, thats the guitar players job. It doesn't fit, and neither do 6 strings in blues. They sound out of place just like a Steve Vai guitar solo would.
     
  9. Mark Wilson

    Mark Wilson Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jan 12, 2005
    Toronto, Ontario
    Endorsing Artist: Elixir® Strings
    Who said that it's the guitar players job? Why do we bassists have to be stuck in the back? No one said we can't play chords in blues.
    (Yes, I saw the "In my Opinion" part. This just sounds bad online :D)


    -Mark
     
  10. flatwoundfender

    flatwoundfender

    Feb 24, 2005
    Most blues bassists will tell you that. Find me an example of blues bassist playing chords on a blues album. And you can stick to the back, which someone needs to do, and still play awesome lines (ie Jamerson).
     
  11. steve4765630

    steve4765630

    Feb 27, 2006
    I play a 6 string fretless bass in a blues group. Shoot me. It's a sweet bass with a better p-bass sound than any p-bass I've ever played. Plus, it's a 3 piece band and when the guitar player is doing a solo I can fill in the gaps with some chords. Blues is a progressive style. Let's not be stick-in-the-muds about what basses we use. It's a style of proper note choices, not about what tool you use to choose them. I also play jazz on a Music Man Stingray. It sounds cool and I don't get complaints for any band members. Tone is in the fingers anyway. So the next time you play a wedding take your US Custom Shop Glitter Pink Warlock and play the socks off of it.

    "It's not the size of the neck, it's how you strangle it."
     
  12. flatwoundfender

    flatwoundfender

    Feb 24, 2005
    Better pbass sound than any pbass you've ever played? How does that work. And chords are not needed to fill in the gaps.
     
  13. Mark Wilson

    Mark Wilson Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jan 12, 2005
    Toronto, Ontario
    Endorsing Artist: Elixir® Strings
    Why not have the option?

    And also, Why do I need to find you someone who did that? Why do we have to play like someone else? Be your own bass player. Don't stick to restrictions.


    -Mark
     
  14. IotaNet

    IotaNet Supporting Member

    Sorry my friend but I have seen it done quite effectively.

    Last fall, I was at the Christian Musician's Summit working the Barker Booth. Tom Sczell was playing a 5-string Barker bass and in the booth to our right, there was a drummer and (a very GOOD!) guitarist. We had numerous impromptu jam sessions throughout the conference -- much to the delight of the people in the exhibit hall.

    As it turns out, Todd Johnson (Yes, that Todd Johnson -- the one who has an online forum here) was in the booth to our left. From time to time, he would join in on a tune on his 6-string Zon ... doing a LOT of fill chords and accompanying the groove.

    Granted, they were doing jazzier stuff but they were really just playing blues grooves and taking turns soloing over them (they did a wicked rendition of Miles Davis' "All Blues!")

    It was off the hook!
     
  15. IotaNet

    IotaNet Supporting Member

    Exactly.
     
  16. flatwoundfender

    flatwoundfender

    Feb 24, 2005
    Ok let me go into specifics. If you were playing with Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy, Albert Collins, Albert King, Freddie King, chords don't really fit. Now if you were playing with jazz guys playing blues you might have some ground there. I really care for playing chords on the bass because in order to make then clear you have lose some of the bass. Plus it requires low action and light gauge strings.
     
  17. phxlbrmpf

    phxlbrmpf

    Dec 27, 2002
    Germany
    Noel Redding plays double stops on Hendrix's "Red House" and it doesn't sound out of place at all. Colin Hodgkinson is also a blues player who likes to do chords. I can imagine a 6 string being a great bass to use in a Blues trio.
     
  18. flatwoundfender

    flatwoundfender

    Feb 24, 2005
    Double stops are a little different than full chords. And Noel Redding was also a guitar player. And as far as Colin Hodgkinson do you have some examples, from what I see he was more a fusion player.
     
  19. Nedmundo

    Nedmundo Supporting Member

    Jan 7, 2005
    Philadelphia
    I'll agree that some basses are better in some styles or tunes than others, but almost any decent combination of player, bass, and rig will sound good in almost any situation. A P-bass might not be ideal for the latter generations of King Crimson, but I guarantee Tony Levin (or whoever it is these days) would still blow our minds with one. And to address your examples specifically, I heard an excellent blues trio last year with a bassist using a six string Fodera. He (and it) sounded fantastic.
     
  20. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    If a Steinberger can lay down the phat wide bottom for Reggae, why wouldn't it work for Rap?