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Spector SSD NS-5CR vs. Euro 5 LX

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Paulhauser, Nov 12, 2006.


  1. Paulhauser

    Paulhauser

    Aug 1, 2006
    Hungary
    Which is considered to better?

    The NS-5Cr which Spector /SSD made in Czech Republic from '94 to '98 or the more recent version of the model, the Euro 5 LX?

    I know some main spec differences, like NS-5Cr having 34" scale, EMG electronics, full alder body (?) whereas the Euro has 35" scale, TonePump and maple/wallnut laminated body.

    I can not find to much info about NS-5CRs, I'm definetely unsure about the wood and there is this rumour that the necks for those were made in the USA, and shipped to CR for assembling. Is it true? How about the Euro necks?
    Anyone with some knowledge, please share!

    So which one is considered to be better,overall quality, tone wise?
     
  2. Arthur U. Poon

    Arthur U. Poon

    Jan 30, 2004
    SLC, Utah -USA-
    Endorsing Artist: Mike Lull Custom Basses
    I can't answer all of your questions, but I'm pretty sure the NS5CRFM's body wings are made of maple. I the LX models body wings are made from alder with a thin slice of walnut and a figuerd maple (other exotic top-woods are available on the "E" models) top. As far as the necks being US made, I think this was the case with the first Euro 6 LX models, and could very well be the case with early examples of each Czech-made model, but I'm not 100% sure.

    I believe the earlier NSCR models had the EMG BTS eq, which is a 2-band boost/cut setup. Then they used the Aguilar OBP-1, which is a 2-band boost only. Now of course, they feature the Spector Tone Pump eq.

    I hope this helps,
    -Art

    You can find the specs on www.spectorbass.com. They're also very good at answering email questions.
     
  3. Paulhauser

    Paulhauser

    Aug 1, 2006
    Hungary
    Thanks!
    You are right about the woods, I mixed up.

    I looked around on the Spector website and found very little information on the NSCR (which is not a big suprise the model being an old one) Emailing them is a good idea, I'll do that.

    Anyway, I'm still interested in the comparison between the two models, if someone A-B'd them please comment.
    Also curious about the neck issue :)
     
  4. Spector_Ray

    Spector_Ray

    Aug 8, 2004
    Texas
    They're both really nice basses. As far as looks and hardware, they're both pretty much identical. The NSCRFM's used EMG BTS, Aguilar OBP-1 or Tonepump preamps whereas the Euros use the Tonepump exclusively(I think?). The wood is where the difference is. Since the NSCRFM basses are all maple body wings, they're going to be a bit brighter in tone. The LX models have the alder/walnut/maple wings and it does seem to warm it up a bit. They both play and feel awesome. Only the Euro LX-35's are 35" scale. The other Euro's are all 34" scale.
    If you have any questions about a particular bass or more in-depth question, email PJ Rubal(pj@spectorbass.com). He's super friendly and tries to answer all correspondence no matter how small.
     
  5. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    The later model NS5CRFM's were 35" scale. I had one. It was a solid flame maple body, 35" scale, with the crown inlays on the fretboard.
     
  6. Paulhauser

    Paulhauser

    Aug 1, 2006
    Hungary
    Thanks people!
     
  7. mikeswals

    mikeswals Supporting Member

    Nov 18, 2002
    Seattle / Tacoma
    The term LX is a recent term meaning the body is made of two different woods.

    The name NS5CRFM is what they used for may years on the older model, they had all maple bodies, but there were different versions of it.
    The 'SSD' was 34" scale, had dot inlays, full EMG electronics.
    The 'Spector' was 35" scale, had crown inlays, full EMG electronics-but around '02 started using Aguilar preamps, then Tone Pumps around '04.
     

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