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Spirocore "E" Question

Discussion in 'Strings [DB]' started by telarcfatigue, Apr 22, 2002.


  1. telarcfatigue

    telarcfatigue

    Mar 16, 2002
    My bass is strung with Spiro Solo's which I dig, except the "E" is flapping on the Fingerboard, obviously because of the low-tension. I would like to replace this string for a heavier string that would not "flap" and would also hopefully give me a little more low end. The Spiro sole "flaps" out even at a moderate pizz strike---Any suggestions?
     
  2. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I use Spiro Orchestra gauge, which are a couple of steps up the tension food-chain from the solos, and no flap here. The next higher Spiro tension - if I am not greatly mistaken - are the Weich gauge.
     
  3. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    For what it is worth, I was using Dominants solos. I loved the sound, but got almost no volume out of them and the E string was particularly floppy.

    I am a newbie, so I thought the tension would be easier to deal with.

    I strung up with Spirocore Weich a few weeks ago. Noticeably more volume (and tension) and the E string tension was much better.

    Although I still have a comparitively floppy E string. I am very seriously considering switching out just the E string for a Spirocore Orchestra E and leave the Weich on the other three. I think this will balance the volume a little better and loose some of the floppiness.


    Any thoughts?


    Chas
     
  4. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    SPAZZLEGS,

    That sounds like a reasonable plan. Be careful though: once you start putting the Orchs on your bass, you will have entered THE SPIROCORE ZONE...and many (including myself) will tell you that once you have entered this zone, it's hard to leave. First, you notice the clarity, projection, and sustain of the E string; next, you think, "Hmmm, that E sounds so good that now my G string sounds a little weak...maybe I should try an Orch gauge G string".... and after that it's all history. Be warned. :)
     
  5. telarcfatigue

    telarcfatigue

    Mar 16, 2002
    Thanks for the feedback, I 'm going to go ahead and get an Orch. "E" this week, I'm sure it will add a little bottom to my baby--Hey by the way , does anyone have any arco observations among the different gauges of Spiro's, or di they all pretty much bow the same?--My solo's are a little screechy, for sure---But, then again I'm using a Glasser Fibrefake bow------Is that donkey hair on this thing?--
     
  6. sean p

    sean p

    Mar 7, 2002
    eugene, oregon
    i thought that the weichs were LOWER tension that the orchestrals? doesn't 'weich' mean 'soft' by thomastik's translation?

    sean p
     
  7. Monte

    Monte

    Jan 9, 2001
    New Albany, MS
    That's the price you pay with Spiros, although George Mraz has no problem getting a great arco tone with them. Us mortals tend to have problems with it though.

    Monte
     
  8. Monte

    Monte

    Jan 9, 2001
    New Albany, MS
    They are, and that was what Chris was saying. It took me a little bit to understand it the way he put it. He is saying that going from solos to orchestrals was two notches up in tension, but that the Weich were between.

    Monte
     
  9. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Thanks for clarifying that. Obviously, i didn't put it very well. As far as I know, the highest tension Spiros are the STARK. In my more careless moments, I think about trying out a set of these. Then, I look down at my poor fingers and reconsider.
     
  10. jimclark68

    jimclark68

    Dec 16, 2000
    Morganton, NC
    "That sounds like a reasonable plan. Be careful though: once you start putting the Orchs on your bass, you will have entered THE SPIROCORE ZONE...and many (including myself) will tell you that once you have entered this zone, it's hard to leave. First, you notice the clarity, projection, and sustain of the E string; next, you think, "Hmmm, that E sounds so good that now my G string sounds a little weak...maybe I should try an Orch gauge G string".... and after that it's all history. Be warned."

    Heed this warning. I tried orchestras after using weichs for a while, and I'm tossing the weichs.
     
  11. I've wondered about the effect of installing one string with a tension significantly different from the rest of the set. Does anything happen to the performance of the other strings?

    I'm assuming telarc has the solo strings tuned down to EADG, and that's why the E is flapping, because the tension of a solo F# at pitch is the same as a Spirocore orchestra E.

    So, in possible answer to my own question, before buying the Spirocore E, I would tune the solo "E" all the way up to F# and see how the other strings react.
     
  12. telarcfatigue

    telarcfatigue

    Mar 16, 2002
    anDONte'----
    Thanks for the idea on that F# thing--I'll try that and see if it affects the overall tension of the set--I would predict the whole step up to be minimal in that regard--
    I am of course tuning EADG, and where I do like these lower tension strings right now, I do planning on changing to a complete set of Orchestra's soon--I don't want to get too used to this "friendly" tension setting----
     
  13. Thomguy

    Thomguy

    Oct 15, 2001
    New York, USA
    It looks like some clarification is needed here. I feel for you because even when you have the (old) catalog in front of you it can be confusing! here's the skinny, though:

    The Spirocore's are available in Orchestral Tuning (most popular) and Solo tuning and range from 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 and 4/4 sizes. Solo tuning is only available in Mittle (medium) tension in all sizes and is tuned a step up; A, E, B, F# while Orchestral tuning is G,D,A,E. Spirocore Orchestral strings are available in Stark, Mittle and Weich (pronounced vike) in 4/4 size, Mittle & Weich in 3/4 & 1/2 sizes and Mittle only in 1/4 size.

    Although the solo tuning is a bit heavier in tension on full size (by 6.7lbs total) it is not as dramatic a difference as it is between Weich, Mittle, and Stark tensions. Weich is German for weak, so those are the soft (257.80lbs) Mittle means, well, middle or medium (286.60lbs) and Stark, means strong, or hard (324.20lbs) There are even a few who get the solo set and tune it orchestral. The resultant tension is a bit lower than even the Spirocore Weich!

    The Weich's have purple silk wrap at the peg head end, the Mittle's have red silk, the Stark's have green silk and the Solo tuning strings have yellow silk. They all have red silk at the ball end.

    I hope this helps. If anyone here would like a catalog for further clarification, feel free to call or email directly and I'll send one out right away. Although I have more knowledge and practical experience with the fretted string line, I am available anytime via email or toll free should anyone have any other questions and don't feel like typing them.

    Best regards,
    Kevin Reynolds
    Connolly & Co.
    Exclusive US Importers of Thomastik-Infeld Strings
    1-800-644-5268
    kevinr@connollyandco.com