Split Headstock

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Davidoc, Jan 4, 2002.

  1. A hunk of the headstock of a friend's guitar broke off (it was dropped), and the top part fell off. It fell off clean, and no wood fell off. The break was straight.

    What do you suggest that I do? It works fine when held in place. Would you suggest doing? Should I glue it back somehow? Do you think the warranty covers it?
  2. Check the paperwork on the warantee, it should tell you what the policy covers.

    IMO, I don't think that dropping it would be covered.
  3. nanook


    Feb 9, 2000
    Here you go. This stuff is designed for wood and it will hold anything. I keep some around all the time for the tough jobs. I fixed a wooden gunstock with it 20 years ago and not only is it still holding but the repair cannot even be detected with the naked eye!


    Do a search for epoxy and it will come up.

    You will need product # 081-017-117 Resin
    and #081-017-118 Hardner

    It will cost about $42 American dollars
  4. rllefebv


    Oct 17, 2000
    Newberg, Oregon
    I don't understand how a can break off, but no wood fell off. Do you mean a clean break with no splintering?

    Either way, there are a few different ways to go about making a repair like this. Not having more information, I can't really speak as to the best way to go about repairing it. Two ways of mending breaks that have been successful for me in the past have been using dowels or inlaying a splint. They're both fairly adventurous, and if you're not confident in your woodworking skills, then I'd advise against attempting them... I'm never very satisfied with just gluing a break...

    For a fairly clean split, the two peices can be glued together. After the glue has cured, (depends on the glue, but I never rush this stuff... 24 to 48 hours, or until I've gotten my courage up!), drill a hole at each end of the split that bisects the repair. Into each of these holes, you'll glue a maple dowel. I prefer to drill through, but that may not be practical. Again, I can't tell from the description. After everything has cured, trim the dowel flush to the surface, sand and refinish. With care, (and an opaque finish), this repair can be invisible. I've done this twice, once with a headstock and once with the upper bout of a no-name guitar and as far as I know, both are still functioning fine...

    Another way that works well with splintered breaks is inlaying a splint, a rectangular stick, (if you will), that spans the break. This is a much more difficult fix, and the only time I have done it has been on a pretty hammered high school upright bass that had split mid-neck, fingerboard and all, due to vandalism. I glued the splintered ends together after removing some of the stringier splinters. After curing, I routed one deep slot into the neck through the fingerboard, (the fingerboard was not going to be replaced), and another into the back of the neck. Both slots bisected the break. Into these were set two splines of maple. After they were completely cured, they were planed down even with the fingerboard and the back of the neck and shaped. Wood putty was used to fill in spots where the splinters were removed, everything was sanded smooth, the fingerboard re-dyed, and the bass was pronounced good enough for use. I was never satisfied with this job and would have replaced the fingerboard if the bass was mine, but school budgets being what they are... The repair was functional, and I did it for free just for the experience. I think I have pictures of this repair somewhere and will scan and post them if I can dig them up...

    Like Wang, I'd doubt that dropping was covered... looks like this may be a learning experience!

    Good luck,

    edit - clarification of a point... rl
  5. rllefebv


    Oct 17, 2000
    Newberg, Oregon
  6. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    If you do, you are a braver man than I, Robert!:D
  7. Hey Robert, if you have those pictures, post them up! This is a setup forum, they are more than welcome.

    As for the Fender neck with the cracked headstock weeelllll depends. lol I wouldn't buy it as my intricate wood working skills aren't the best. Be a nice little challenge tho. And for only $25


  8. Suburban


    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden