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spoiled by reverend rumblefish - rolling fretboards

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by tragicmagic, Feb 28, 2004.


  1. I tried out a NOS reverend rumblefish at a store and fell in love with the feel of the neck... mostly because of the worn vintage style rolled fretboard edges.

    So I rolled the edges on a few of my basses with a sanding block and got good results. But those are on basses with rosewood fretboards... I just used a little lemon oil on the new exposed wood and it's just as new.

    I have a G&L ASAT thinline with a maple fretboard (satin finish). I'd like to roll the edges on it too, but my main concern is leaving the exposed maple since the finish protection will be removed from the edges - will this be a problem? Do I have to refinish the neck to keep it from getting messed up by the climate? (i live in NYC)

    - tragicmagic
     
  2. Shy of a complete refinish on the back and sides of the neck, I don't think there's a perfect solution to this. But here's a coupla DIY approaches that might work:

    - Do the rolling just like you successfully did on the others. Tape off the neck except for the edges that are now exposed and mist in no fewer than 2 coats of clear polyurethane from a rattle can. The MinWax or Varathane products are pretty good and obtainable. I would then lightly wet sand with 600 grit and wipe dry, clean it up and spray 1 last coat on. Let it set up, remove the tape, let it cure not just dry and then lightly h a 0000 steel wool pad. That should help blend the tape lines a little.

    - Do the same prep and sanding as above but use a high grade clear fingernail polish as the top coat. Believe it or not, these are nitrocellulose paints with thickening solids dissolved into them. They are the luthiers friend. You would apply a couple of coats, sand, and repeat until you got the build you wanted. Finish off the same way as the poly.

    These methods aren't suitable for high end instruments and should only be attempted if you are confident in your abilities.
     
  3. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    "use a high grade clear fingernail polish as the top coat. Believe it or not, these are nitrocellulose paints with thickening solids dissolved into them. They are the luthiers friend."

    One of the best kept secrets in the business. Careful mixing can yield virtually any touch up color.