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Squier gone fretless anyone?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Greg Johnsen, Feb 19, 2006.


  1. Greg Johnsen

    Greg Johnsen

    May 1, 2005
    Hickory NC
    ok, so after months of trying to convince my parents to let me do something to my squier, they let me do one of the stupidest things you can do to a bass if you haven't done it before, and that's de-fret and epoxy the neck. My squier neck didn't turn out so hot, but I did a faiely decent job de fretting because there were only a few chips where the frets ripped out the wood. So I went to home depot, and I find myself some pour on epoxy (not sure if it's the best stuff...) and it cost me 20 bucks. I went home, mixed up a batch, and layed the stuff on thick (my first mistake), then, I let it dry hanging off of a clothes hanger (not a good idea) and the epoxy dripped, and gathered at the bottom of the neck. I sanded it down as far as I could (not very) and tried it again. I let it sit for a few days,a and when I came back, it was still sticky! I figured I had mixed the epoxy wrong and I'd now have to buy a new neck ( no biggie). I threw the old one out, and went onto RondoMusic.com. I found the fretless neck I wanted (maple/maple jazz) and I bought it. i then wandered over to guitarpartsresource.com and found a great allparts pickguard I wanted for 20 bucks, I got that. So the stuff startes to arrive and I put everything on, and there wasn't that much hassle except for me having to drill new holes for the pickguard. Everything turned out for the best in the end, I went to GC, picked up some XL Chromes, and I got a setup (36 bucks, ouch) after spending 2 hours at GC, we came home, and the first thing I did was plug this baby in, and wow is she hot. She plays great, but the sound could be a little better (I'm gonna save up for new pickups when my parents let me). I plan on adding ash trays cause I love them so much, and new tuners ( these are horrible right now).

    And because the bass doesn't exist without pictures, I'm gonna post some, AND a soundclip.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    IF anyone has done stuff like this to their squiers, SXs, or other brands bass, please post it.

    Thanks,
    Greg
     
  2. How does that SX neck feel and play?? I've heard some skepticism from players about only paying somewhere in the range of $40 for neck. Kind of makes me wander to, but I guess you know for sure, huh? lol

    -ryan-
     
  3. Greg Johnsen

    Greg Johnsen

    May 1, 2005
    Hickory NC
    well, it rises in some places where the glue was put, but nothing too bad that it can't be fixed with a little sanding. I didn't really think about how bad the fretless neck could be, because it can't be sharp where the fretlines are, and if stuff comes out of the slots (the plastic strips) then it's not biggie, I e-mail rondo and ask for another one. It's not the greatest fretless neck, but it's better than most MIM's I've played.

    Greg
     
  4. ElBajista

    ElBajista

    Dec 13, 2005
    Sebring, FL
    That's a nice looking neck........yowza.

    I like the look of those SX necks, I might spring for one for an upcoming project of mine.
     
  5. Greg,

    Why did you get rid of the old neck? That neck was easily salvagable and made into a good fretless neck. Even though it's cheap, it's good to practice the procedure on and end up with a nice usable neck. Since you stuffed it up the first time, you have nothing to lose the second time around or maybe you could have sold or given it to someone else who could have repaired and used it.
     
  6. Greg Johnsen

    Greg Johnsen

    May 1, 2005
    Hickory NC
    true. I didn't think of it that way. However, I'm not sure many people would want a squier neck with solidified epoxy dripes all around the neck and headstock...

    greg
     
  7. Greg Johnsen

    Greg Johnsen

    May 1, 2005
    Hickory NC
    I'm quite content with the SX neck, it feels and plays better than my squier one, so you shouldn't feel pity.

    Greg
     
  8. Well, I know for sure that there plenty of people who have the ability and would want to fix that neck, it's a no brainer really. If you ever gain enough experience with this kind of work, then you may learn what reuse is all about rather than throwing away good resources and spending more money to buy replacements you don't need.

    Another point is that you had an opportunity to learn from your mistake that would have quadrupled your knowledge and skills, but you decided to throw all that away. Self learning from mistakes is one of the most beneficial ways of learning and building skills and has a flow on effect in all areas.
     
  9. Greg Johnsen

    Greg Johnsen

    May 1, 2005
    Hickory NC
    ah, but I did learn. I learned to measure correctly, and take my time. Stuff like that shouldn't be rushed, but I did then so if I ever do it again, I won't. I didn't even realize the neck could have been salvageable, if I knew, I would've given it to someone who wanted it.

    Greg
     
  10. callmeMrThumbs

    callmeMrThumbs Guest

    Oct 6, 2005
    Omaha, NE
    Heck, I would've taken that neck! Holy Bajebers! I don't care if it's a Squier or a Moses, it's something to work on! sheesh...I've refinished my Peavey neck three times (fingerboard's almost down to nothing...), but I still haven't bought a replacement because I'm still learning from it! And guess what...it sounds great!!! AND IT WAS FREEEEEEEEE!!!!

    whew...okay....taking deep breaths

    -Josh

    PS. In building anything....EVERYTHING is salvageable. (if it isn't, pull a Hambone and nail it to the wall).
     
  11. Greg Johnsen

    Greg Johnsen

    May 1, 2005
    Hickory NC
    wow, now that I think about it, I should've kept it. The epoxy was really stick *after 3 days of drying* but I'm sure I could've gone at it with a drill with a sanding pad attached. Oh well, too late. Now I know.

    Greg