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Stabilization bars: which Fender necks have them

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by bassman_al, Aug 25, 2012.


  1. Title says it all, although I forgot the question mark at the end.
    :)

    I know my '62 AV Jazz does not. Pretty sure my more stable '98 USA P-bass and '07 MIM fretless jazz do.

    Anyone know which Fender and Squier necks have the stabilization bars? Thanks!
     
  2. Aussie Player

    Aussie Player

    Apr 20, 2011
    TBers have indicated that only MIA basses from 1995 have them and only in Standard and above models.
    No Specials or retro remakes.
     
  3. mpdd

    mpdd neoconceptualist

    Mar 24, 2010
    LA
    the post 2006 highway ones have them
     
  4. So no MIM necks, huh?
     
  5. Aussie Player

    Aussie Player

    Apr 20, 2011
    Not according to "our" resources.
     
  6. SJan3

    SJan3

    Dec 8, 2010
    Ct.
    The American Specials and American Deluxe also have them.
     
  7. So the MIA line after '95, and Highway One/American Special line have them, but not any of the MIM line or CV or other Squier lines, or any other Asian made basses. Is that accurate?
     
  8. Russell L

    Russell L

    Mar 5, 2011
    Cayce, SC
    How much does it matter? Anyone answer that?
     
  9. Hey Russell, if you have no use for the thread then move on. Flaming and trolling are against TB policy.

    However, if you feel a full explanation for my thread is in order, here is why it matters to me: I have a AV bass which I love. But it has a neck that goes out of adjustment with the change of seasons. I'm in the process of trying to figure out how much the lack if stabilization bars play a roll. I have an MIM neck that holds its settings wonderfully. I learned from this thread that it has no bars. I am considering a VM or CV bass. No stabilization bars but they have great reviews. I'm trying to avoid getting another fussy neck. I love that AV, but would like to avoid having 2 high maintenance necks. I am pretty sure that bars lower the risk of instability in the neck. If I go with CV, I'll be rolling the dice although they seem well made. So there you have it. I didn't post this before because I don't think most people really care to know my particulars.
     
  10. bassman10096

    bassman10096 Supporting Member

    Jul 30, 2004
    MKE
    Happy to respond. In addition to the stability issues already discussed, the addition of graphite spars (or in the case of Warmoth necks, steel bars) in addition to the trussrod also has an audible effect on sound. Generally, the added stiffening increases sustain and may, in cases, contribute to a more even sound across the board with (sometimes) less likelihood of dead spots. On the downside (depending on your taste), unreinforced necks can sound somewhat more subtle, with quicker decay (opposite, I suppose of greater sustain). My two cents...
     
  11. tjh

    tjh Supporting Member

    Mar 22, 2006
    Minnesota
    Al, all of the necks that utilize the graphite support rods are heel adjusting truss rod, but not all heel adjust necks utilize grahite support rods ... if it headstock adjust, skunk stripe, etc, it does not utilize them ... you will find both pro and con to their benefit, some have commented that they notice a difference in sound .. I have had several each way, and notice no difference, but then if you ask my wife I am deaf, so I wouldnt go by my word on that ... i actually prefer headstock adjust truss rods anyway ...

    with regards to your '62 RI, there has been a bit of history of issues with that neck (or maybe I just seemed to focus on a few reports as I was considering it) ... there was a thread dedicated to it if I I remember correctly over on the Fender Discussion Page ... I actually sold a MIM Classic Series 60's Jazz neck to a guy as a replacement for his '62 AV RI, as it twisted beyond usuable for him .. the 60's Classic Series neck looks virtually the same, with tint, logo, vintage frets and 7.25 radius ... If you prefer the 9.5 radius, and still retain the tint, logo, and vintage frets, the MIM Reggie Hamilton is also an option ... I actually have that neck on my 60's Classic Series Jazz ...I have had several of Classic Series 60's, and have not seen or heard of any issues with necks ... however, with that said, needing to adjust truss rod occassionaly/seasonally many will not consider an issue, although some will ...

    ... as far as the Squier CV 60's Jazz neck, I have tried that in pockets of other Fender basses, and never was satisified with the fit ... I dont remember the specifics, but I just remember that I dont consider that as an option any more ... the Squier VM and the older Squier Standard/Precision Special necks are my favorite profile, but although I usually have a couple around (just sold one to Don), I have not put them on any MIA or MIM bodies ...
     
  12. Thanks for the responses! Very useful info! Seasonal adjustments are no problem but it seems mine needs even more than that. But I made a nice truss nut adjustment slot so I can tweak without removing the neck.

    I am mostly trying to determine the best lower budget option should I ever get another bass. Sounds like the MIM 60's bass is going to be a very good option. I have a MIM "classic 70's" body on my fretless. Great body. Light weight. Shielded as part of stock features I believe. All around very happy with it.
     
  13. alnico51

    alnico51 Commercial User

    Sep 16, 2012
    Feasterville, PA
    Owner Leader Music USA Builder
    Hey everyone, I have been going crazy over dead spots and also making neck adjustments on my one piece neck basses for more than 20 years. I have a repair shop and so many customers over the years come in complaining about certain note on the G string, I try to explain to them the nature of the beast and sometime I tune the bass down and show the that the dead spot is frequency related, I remember one bass that the D 7th fret g string first it range D and then the harmonic shot off totally out of tune. More noticeable depending on the setting of the mid range.

    Anyway I tried everything to get rid of them, and also making so many adjustments on the truss rod all the time. But it always seemed to be a headstock issue, the bigger the headstock the worse the truss rod and dead spots. I have been working on this for years. I made a bass (I will post a picture) with the machine heads strung from the back of the headstock and that bass still has never needed a truss rod adjustment, (The design pulls the headstock back instead of forward and actually the string tension pulled the neck straight) Its hard to explain but if you grab your bass and pull back on the headstock the strings will fret out at the first fret. so I figured I will just make the tension pull all the time to stabilize the headstock, It solved the problem.

    A few months ago I did some modification to the machine heads and it fixed allot of the problems I found. Actually I will start making these tuners to retrofit open style gears. If anyone wants a little more details on this just let me know.
     
  14. alnico51

    alnico51 Commercial User

    Sep 16, 2012
    Feasterville, PA
    Owner Leader Music USA Builder
    Hey everyone, I have been going crazy over dead spots and also making neck adjustments on my one piece neck basses for more than 20 years. I have a repair shop and so many customers over the years come in complaining about certain notes on the G string, I try to explain to them the nature of the beast and sometime I tune the bass down and show the that the dead spot is frequency related, I remember one bass that the D 7th fret g string first it range D and then the harmonic shot off totally out of tune. More noticeable depending on the setting of the mid range.

    Anyway I tried everything to get rid of them, and also making so many adjustments on the truss rod all the time. But it always seemed to be a headstock issue, the bigger the headstock the worse the truss rod and dead spots. I have been working on this for years. I made a bass (I will post a picture) with the machine heads strung from the back of the headstock and that bass still has never needed a truss rod adjustment, (The design pulls the headstock back instead of forward and actually the string tension pulled the neck straight) Its hard to explain but if you grab your bass and pull back on the headstock the strings will fret out at the first fret. so I figured I will just make the tension pull all the time to stabilize the headstock, It solved the problem.

    A few months ago I did some modification to the machine heads and it fixed allot of the problems I found. Actually I will start making these tuners to retrofit open style gears. If anyone wants a little more details on this just let me know.
     
  15. Gaolee

    Gaolee Official leathers tester and crash dummy

    That's very interesting to me. It makes logical sense, but I never thought of it before. I will be very interested to see how this turns out and what the tuners are like when you have them ready to go.
     

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