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Stage caused boominess?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Tenchibo, Mar 4, 2003.


  1. Tenchibo

    Tenchibo

    Dec 8, 2002
    At a gig last weekend, i set up how i normally do in practice, with my 1x15 and my peavey 210 watt head. I had it on 3 to 4, with bass at 3 or 4, mid at 6ish, and treble at 5 or 6ish. This is how I always practice. Anyway, we started, and i got alot of complaints about too much boominess and low end. To my knowlege I wasn't in the PA. The stage is the only cause for this I can think of, as it was apoorly constructed raised wooden platform. Would this affect the sound so dramatically?
     
  2. RichBriere

    RichBriere Guest

    Jan 1, 2003
    Upstate NY
    Sounds like a perfect time to make use of one of those plastic milk cartons that NONE of us have ever...uhm...."borrowed". Uncouple your cab from the hollow stage and you'll probably have much less boom.

    RB
     
  3. K-Frog

    K-Frog

    Feb 6, 2002
    Camden, AR, USA
    yep, i had the same problem at a church I played in years ago. I had my to use a foam pad to "de-couple" my combo from the big raised platform stage. Some people, in some cases, will recommend you get your amp/cab down on the floor to enhance bass response. You are experiencing the other extreme.
    K
     
  4. Fuzzbass

    Fuzzbass P5 with overdrive Supporting Member

    It might not be the stage, it could be the acoustics of the room itself. One of the most difficult bars I've ever played has no stage at all: the band performs on the concrete foundation, so there's nothing resonant to decouple from.
     
  5. Had the same thing happen to me. Cheap wooden platform. Using my 4x10+1x15 I ended up turning off the 1x15 after failing to remove the mud with my EQ and it worked.
     
  6. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    In general, the further your speaker cabinet is from large reflecting surfaces, such as walls, ceilings, or floors, the less boomy it will sound.

    To help you visualize: the practical ultimate in boominess would be to have your cabinet on the floor in a corner of the room. The (impractical) ultimate in non-boominess would be to have your cabinet suspended in mid-air in the middle of the room. Somewhere in between is probably what you want. ;)
     
  7. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    One more thing: The larger the ratio of the wavelength to the size of the speaker and cabinet, the less directional the radiated sound is. At very low frequencies, a speaker cabinet tends to be omnidiectional.

    Conversely, larger drivers (like your 15) tend to "beam" at higher frequencies (IOW, become more directional), and if your speaker cab isn't actually pointed at the audience, they'll get more low end than you probably expected.
     
  8. P. Aaron

    P. Aaron Supporting Member

    Whenever I play on a stage or "riser" I'm always upping the mids and highs. Though, my overall volume comes down. My current rig, (a 70's Bassman 4x10 combo) doesn't have much of anything to begin with. The combo does have casters.

    On concrete, I'm as flat as pancake.
     
  9. RichBriere

    RichBriere Guest

    Jan 1, 2003
    Upstate NY
    A Bassman 4x10? Ya' don't see many of those floating around. A VERY cool rig, indeed!:bassist:

    RB
     
  10. jcadmus

    jcadmus

    Apr 2, 2000
    Boominess is bad?

    :meh:
     
  11. RichBriere

    RichBriere Guest

    Jan 1, 2003
    Upstate NY
    It's good when connected to a cannon........:D

    RB
     
  12. Whappo Grande

    Whappo Grande

    Feb 9, 2002
    Santa Clara, CA.
    Manager: AccuGroove Speakers
    Rich & K-Frog are correct. The easiest & cheapest thing to do is get your 15 off the floor, even if only 4 inches.

    There are many rooms where that's not an issue, but when it is, that's the best fix.
     
  13. corinpills

    corinpills

    Nov 19, 2000
    Boston, MA
    I hear ya. There's a club in Boston called Bill's Bah and every time we play there , if I hit an A atthe 12 th fret, the whole stage starts vibrating. I mean, I'm usually going for maximum boominess, but I don't like to be moved across the stage by vibrations.

    One thing that I find with less experienced bass players (and guitarists) is that they get to a club and immediately set their EQ the same way they set it at practice. The whole deal is to tweak it in relation to the room. It does take years of experience to try to understand what to tweak.
     
  14. RichBriere

    RichBriere Guest

    Jan 1, 2003
    Upstate NY
    It either takes years of experience, OR........you're fortunate enough to be a young and/or inexperienced player who happens to stumble across a statement as well written as the one you left. I received an Email the other day that said "Ya mean the EQ is SUPPOSED to change?" The common thought among many is that ya' set it in the smiley face pattern and leave it there for all eternity. Well said, Corrinpills! :cool:

    RB
     
  15. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny

    Jan 19, 2002
    NY / NJ / PA
    oh yea, better yet, the Auralex that all of us seem to be jumping aboard.

    helped me tremendously, when i played on a one of those gymateria stages. the hollow storage area underneath was like a big extra unwanted subwoofer. the drummer and i loved it, cause it made the whole room shake. hehe... but, the boominess literally made things muddier than bog.

    the auralex, for better or worse fixed that quickly. :(
     
  16. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny

    Jan 19, 2002
    NY / NJ / PA
    when its not punchie, flabby, and mushy in the low end like Anna Nicole, you know its trouble. :eek:

    but EQ-wise, i like to actually cut back on the lower lows, and bump up the lower mids, for a more inyourface, chest thumpie bass attack.
     
  17. see the recent posts on this subject.
    do a search on gramma.

    if you have 50 bucks to spare just get an Auralex Gramma. It won't solve every problem you have, but will help. I also use mine to "decouple" my amp rig from my bigger cab w/casters. I put it between the cab and rack case. Don't need it on the cab with the casters most of the time.